Tag Archives: food

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Setting The Standard

New Albany restaurant changes concept in light of COVID-19
BY LISA HORNUNG | PHOTOS BY JOSH KEOWN


There are a lot of potential disasters for which
restaurant owners can anticipate and prepare. A
global pandemic was never one of them.
Beau Kerley and Tim Smith have not come
through this worldwide storm without a few
scratches. That’s why they are changing the business
concept for their restaurant, The Standard Plate &
Pour, 207 E. Main St., in New Albany.
While the veteran restaurateurs haven’t dealt
with a massive shutdown like this before, they’ve
managed to keep several restaurants running and
the others are nearly back to their regular business.
But The Standard is now switching to a facility
that will only be open for private events, including
rentals and special functions put on by the company.
“We’re going to be closed except for private(rentals). We’re going to be doing wedding
rehearsals and business meetings and just every
private event we can do,” Kerley said. “We’re also
going to be putting on our own private events like
bourbon dinners or wine dinners. Against the Grain
breweries are going to be doing a takeover of our
patio, and we’re gonna have a band out there one
night in August.”Extol+Summer+2020_Page_23_Image_0001
While most businesses have struggled through
the pandemic, the restaurant industry has been
hit especially hard, with an estimated $145
billion shortfall during the first four months of
the COVID-19 shutdown in the United States,
according to the National Restaurant Association.
June showed the highest monthly sales volume since
March but still remained about $18 billion down
from the pre-coronavirus sales levels in January
and February, the association said in mid-July.
The Standard felt it, too. “There was a little period
of time we saw a little bit of an uptick (in business)
there,” Kerley said. “We opened, and at first it
was really slow. Then, we saw a little uptick and
thought, ‘OK, well then, we’re gonna go here and
do something,’ but it just never really continued.
The margins in restaurants are so small, it just
doesn’t make sense.”Extol+Summer+2020_Page_23_Image_0002
The pair have worked together for about 11 years,
starting at Bluegrass Brewing Company (Kerley is
still a partner at BBC) and then went to Crescent Hill
Craft House in Louisville, but decided they wanted
to strike out on their own. So, a few years ago they
started 812 Pizza Company in Georgetown. The
two also own Dos Gringos and the Early Edition
in Jeffersonville, and they opened The Standard about a year ago.
“Owning multiple restaurants, each restaurant
has had its own challenges. The Standard’s been
tough. It’s a nighttime, date-night market to begin
with. And that’s one thing that we’ve found is that
date-night places have kind of been left out. At 812
Pizza Company, which is a family-style place that
delivers, our business has been doing really well
there. It came back really quick. But as to places
that are the nicer places, that still hasn’t come
back,” Kerley said in early July.
Kerley said he understands why business was
so slow. People are still unsure of their financial
future and aren’t splurging on evenings out. So,
places that, “you go for a nice evening and a nice
meal and a bottle of wine, they’re struggling a little
more, I think,” Kerley said.
Though The Standard is popular, translating that
to dollars is different. “The interesting thing about
The Standard is that it’s one of our best-reviewed
restaurants,” Kerley said. “I have people call me all
the time and tell me how great of a time they had
there and how much they love their food, their
experience, the service. But it’s just, you love it
but you just don’t go there very often, you know?
That’s kind of weird: I have restaurants that do a
lot more business and aren’t as well-reviewed.”
The change in concept helps the restaurant focus
on the needs of the community without having to
gamble on when customers will come in, potentially
wasting costs. The menu will be based on the
evening’s events, but many of The Standard’s most
popular dishes will be incorporated, and the focus
on Southern cuisine will stay, Kerley said. There
won’t be a room fee, but there will be minimums
and several tiers of catering options.
“We’re gonna be booking our own band nights,
and we’re going to do dinner and a show, dinner
and music and maybe things like that,” he said. They
will sell tickets and take reservations for the special
events. “But we’re going to have more control over
it and make it more of a special thing, and know
exactly how many people are going to be there as
opposed to just being hopeful that people come
in. We’re going to try to take a negative and turn
it into a positive.”
The Standard’s fun patio will also be available, he
said. “When we look at what our strength is there,
which separates us from other places, we have a
really nice patio,” Kerley said. “We’re trying to use
that strength and invest more in stuff that makes that
more accessible and more of a more of a spotlight. Extol+Summer+2020_Page_22_Image_0001”The shift means a tighter focus on offerings,
but no loss of jobs. “Luckily, we have five or six restaurants, so all of our employees are going to be employed. A lot of them are going to go work at Tucker’s, and a few of them are going to go work at Dos Gringos, because we just redid Tucker’s so we needed the staff anyway” Kerley said. “So this was
good timing. We’re going to be able to offer all of
our employees, you know, full-time employment
in other places, so it works out.”
During the days of the full shutdown, The Standard
was completely closed because “Downtown New
Albany was a ghost town,” Kerley said. But carryout
and delivery sales actually increased at the pair’s
other restaurants, especially at 812 Pizza. Now
all of Kerley and Smith’s other restaurants are
available for carry-out and curbside service, as
well as free delivery.
Now that their other restaurants are open, they’ve
seen a 5 to 10 percent increase in carryout sales. “I
think there’s gonna be a lot of people who aren’t
going to be comfortable (coming inside yet),” Kerley
said in July. “People who still have illnesses that
keep them from going outside right now, you know,
there’s a high likelihood to (contract the virus).”
Kerley and Smith are optimistic and thankful
for the community’s support. “We love our rapport
we’re getting from everybody locally, and we hope
people continue to come out to local businesses
and help us out,” Kerley said. “We appreciate all
the support we’ve gotten from people. Just people
supporting us is such a huge deal, and we want to thank everybody.”
But don’t expect the pair to give in to economic
uncertainty anytime soon.
“We’re not quitters: We’re not giving up, and we
still think the place is awesome. We’re just gonna
try to shape it into what people want it to be,” Kerley
said. “Instead of forcing what we think should
be or what we want it to be, we’re gonna kind of
listen to our guests and try to make it something
that they want it to be, and make it where it can
be successful.”

“We love our rapport we’re getting from everybody locally, and we hope people continue to come out.” –Beau Kerley


The Standard Plate & Pour

207 E. Main St.

New Albany

(812) 590-1055

Facebook = @NewAlbanyStandard

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Must Try

Under the helm of uber talented chef Scott Dickenson, 1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks features Southern comfort fusion with fresh farm-totable fare. Delectable main items include a gorgeous Ramen (seriously, it’s beautiful), Pork Belly General Tso and Larry’s Crispy Skin Chicken. But we could happily stick to eating order after order of the Brussels Sprouts and Poutine. They’re THAT delicious. Must Try: If you’re seeking a refreshing change – whether dining in or doing carryout – don’t forget an order of Watermelon Gazpacho. And did we mention the Brussels Sprouts and Poutine? 1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks 100 E. Chestnut St. Corydon (812) 225-5342 @1816Kitchen 1816Kitchen.com

Under the helm of uber talented chef Scott Dickenson, 1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks features Southern comfort fusion with fresh farm-totable fare. Delectable main items include a gorgeous Ramen (seriously, it’s beautiful), Pork Belly General Tso and Larry’s Crispy Skin Chicken. But we could happily stick to eating order after order of the Brussels Sprouts and Poutine. They’re THAT delicious. Must Try: If you’re seeking a refreshing change – whether dining in or doing carryout – don’t forget an order of
Watermelon Gazpacho. And did we mention the Brussels Sprouts and Poutine?
1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks
100 E. Chestnut St.
Corydon
(812) 225-5342
@1816Kitchen
1816Kitchen.com

 

After opening in June, Chicken Salad Chick has quickly garnered rave reviews for its 12 different types of chicken salad – handmade each morning – as well as the sides, sandwiches and sweet treats. Must Try: There’s a chicken salad to please every palate, but don’t forget to give the Pimento Cheese, Grape Salad and Broccoli Salad a try, too. ats carries those staples, too. Unsure how to cook a particular cut, want a suggestion for your next purchase or have a question about where the meats come from? Just ask. The staff is knowledgeable and super friendly. Pop in and we’re pretty sure this will be your new go-to meat market for sure. Follow @preferredmeatsinc on Facebook. Chicken Salad Chick 1520 Veterans Parkway Jeffersonville (812) 504-2360 @ChickenSaladChickJeffersonville Chickensaladchick.com/Jeffersonville

After opening in June, Chicken Salad Chick has quickly
garnered rave reviews for its 12 different types of chicken salad
– handmade each morning – as well as the sides, sandwiches and sweet treats. Must Try: There’s a chicken salad to please every palate, but don’t forget to give the Pimento Cheese, Grape Salad and Broccoli Salad a try, too. ats carries those staples, too. Unsure how to cook a particular cut, want a suggestion for your next purchase or have a question about where the meats come
from? Just ask. The staff is knowledgeable and super friendly. Pop in and we’re pretty sure this will be your new go-to meat market for sure. Follow @preferredmeatsinc on Facebook.
Chicken Salad Chick
1520 Veterans Parkway
Jeffersonville
(812) 504-2360
@ChickenSaladChickJeffersonville
Chickensaladchick.com/Jeffersonville

Red on Main is a family-owned, chef-inspired bistro featuring pasta, steaks, seafood, fresh salads, charcuterie boards and an exquisite speakeasy with a full bar, including handcrafted cocktails. The Black & Bleu Salad is a popular choice (we always ask for extra Smoky Bleu Cheese Dressing). Must Try: Go all in on the specials of the day, which vary from savory soups to delicious entrees. We were lucky to pop in on a day when they were serving Watermelon Basil Gazpacho, and we’re still smiling about a mid-June meal of Shrimp Scampi with a glass of Domaine Laroque Chardonnay. Red on Main 122 E. Main St. Madison (812) 274-0105 @redonmain

Red on Main is a family-owned, chef-inspired
bistro featuring pasta, steaks, seafood, fresh
salads, charcuterie boards and an exquisite
speakeasy with a full bar, including handcrafted
cocktails. The Black & Bleu Salad is
a popular choice (we always ask for extra Smoky
Bleu Cheese Dressing). Must Try: Go all in on
the specials of the day, which vary from savory
soups to delicious entrees. We were lucky to pop
in on a day when they were serving Watermelon
Basil Gazpacho, and we’re still smiling about a
mid-June meal of Shrimp Scampi with a glass of
Domaine Laroque Chardonnay.
Red on Main
122 E. Main St.
Madison
(812) 274-0105
@redonmain

Nestled in the heart of New Washington, The 1894 Lodge bills itself as a neighborhood bar and grill, but it’s so much more. Opt for a formal dining experience and you’ll be seated in the main dining room with its exposed brick and original floors. Relax and unwind in the lounge area. Belly up to the bar, which is made from reclaimed local wood. Or order to-go. You can’t go wrong. Must Try: The 1894 Burger with the Gouda Mac is a sure winner. Or try the chef’s specials. But whatever you do, be sure to save room for the Candied Bacon and Eggs. The 1894 Lodge 409 E. Main St. New Washington (812) 628-9006 @1894Lodge The1894Lodge.com

Nestled in the heart of New Washington, The
1894 Lodge bills itself as a neighborhood bar
and grill, but it’s so much more. Opt for a formal
dining experience and you’ll be seated in the
main dining room with its exposed brick and
original floors. Relax and unwind in the lounge
area. Belly up to the bar, which is made from
reclaimed local wood. Or order to-go. You can’t
go wrong. Must Try: The 1894 Burger with the
Gouda Mac is a sure winner. Or try the chef’s
specials. But whatever you do, be sure to save
room for the Candied Bacon and Eggs.
The 1894 Lodge
409 E. Main St.
New Washington
(812) 628-9006
@1894Lodge
The1894Lodge.com

Fans of The Chicken House were thrilled when it reopened under new ownership and newbies are realizing just why this eatery is legendary and a destination point for people coming from near and far. There are a ton of options, but may we suggest the chicken? Pro Tip: Call ahead for a reservation or to place a to-go order. This is NOT a fast food place, which is exactly why we love it. The Chicken House 7180 Highway 111 Sellersburg (812) 246-9485 @TheChickenHouseSellersburg TheChickenHouseOnline.com Good things come to those who wait – and that includes Tony Impellizzeri’s Sicilian Deep Dish, which takes a good 50 minutes. Call ahead because they’re currently offering carryout only. And don’t forget to order the Famous Breadsticks. Tony Impellizzeri’s Pizza 5170 Charlestown Road New Albany (812) 949-3000 @tonyimpellizzeris Rather try your hand in the kitchen or in the mood to grill? Make a stop at Preferred Meats, where you’ll find meats, sides, adult beverages, spices, vegetables and much more. Call ahead to get you order ready, and be sure to follow the locally-owned, locally-sourced shop on Facebook. Owner Samantha Huber regularly posts about specials, including the occasional stocking of mouth-watering items like Wagyu beef. Preferred Meats 7617 Old State Road 60 Sellersburg (812) 246-5930 @preferredmeatsinc PreferredMeatsInc.com

Fans of The Chicken House were thrilled when it reopened under
new ownership and newbies are realizing just why this eatery is
legendary and a destination point for people coming from near
and far. There are a ton of options, but may we suggest the chicken?
Pro Tip: Call ahead for a reservation or to place a to-go order. This is NOT a
fast food place, which is exactly why we love it.
The Chicken House
7180 Highway 111
Sellersburg
(812) 246-9485
@TheChickenHouseSellersburg
TheChickenHouseOnline.com
Good things come to those who wait – and that includes Tony Impellizzeri’s
Sicilian Deep Dish, which takes a good 50 minutes. Call ahead because they’re currently offering carryout only. And don’t forget to order the
Famous Breadsticks.
Tony Impellizzeri’s Pizza
5170 Charlestown Road
New Albany
(812) 949-3000
@tonyimpellizzeris
Rather try your hand in the kitchen or in the mood to grill? Make a stop at Preferred Meats, where you’ll find meats, sides, adult beverages, spices,
vegetables and much more. Call ahead to get you order ready, and be sure to follow the locally-owned, locally-sourced shop on Facebook.
Owner Samantha Huber regularly posts about specials, including the occasional stocking of mouth-watering items like Wagyu beef.
Preferred Meats
7617 Old State Road 60
Sellersburg
(812) 246-5930
@preferredmeatsinc
PreferredMeatsInc.com

 

 

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The Perfect Pairing: French Lick Winery & Spirits of French Lick

Forget a staycation. Visit Southern Indiana’s perfect pairing, the French Lick Winery and enjoy the spirits of its adjacent distillery, and you’ll be transported to a heavenly locale that feels otherworldly.


Extol’s Must-Savor Summer Spot, the winery offers guests the opportunity
to sample the libations, enjoy a glass – or a bottle – on the patio or in The
Vintage Café, or purchase what you desire for a picnic or gathering. Café fare
is fresh and exquisite. The pizza dough is crafted from a more than 100-year old
recipe straight from Naples, Italy, and the staff makes everything with
the utmost attention – from croutons to meatballs. There are vegetarian and
gluten free options (including cracker, bread and pizza!), too. Menu items
include a divine Charcuterie Board, meatballs, and other starters; pizzas
of all varieties; pastas (vegetarian and gluten free options); salads; a kids
menu (Pizza Taco with a side of grapes, anyone?); gourmet coffees; and a
decadent dessert list, too.
Prefer to try Spirits of French Lick? Try the first Bottle In Bond release,
The Mattie Gladden High Rye Bourbon now available in the tasting room
and gift shop (distribution coming soon).

Take A Trip: French Lick Winery Ready to visit? The Vintage Café restaurant and tasting bar are open. French Lick Winery 8145 W. Sinclair St. West Baden (812) 936-2293 FrenchLickWinery.com @frenchlickwinery Spirits of French Lick SpiritsOfFrenchLick.com @spiritsoffrenchlick

Take A Trip:
French Lick Winery
Ready to visit? The Vintage Café
restaurant and tasting bar are open.
French Lick Winery
8145 W. Sinclair St.
West Baden
(812) 936-2293
FrenchLickWinery.com
@frenchlickwinery
Spirits of French Lick
SpiritsOfFrenchLick.com
@spiritsoffrenchlick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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LUNCHTIME LOVE

How to take your lunch on a culinary adventure

By Adam & Kristin Kleinert


First, please allow me to apologize. Most FamFitter articles have been penned by my wife, Kristin (aka “The Smart One”). She is in her first year as a full-time special education teacher, taking a few college courses, coaching elementary cheerleading and killing it as a mom like always. So, for now, you get me.

This even busier lifestyle we’ve taken on has given me the opportunity (sarcasm) to help out with a few more duties around the house. Aside from writing this article, one area in which I have enjoyed helping is with the kids’ lunches. When I started, my routine consisted of getting up and then trying to throw whatever I could into a lunch box. If there wasn’t time for even that, it was cafeteria lunch for my crew. This lasted until my oldest son challenged me to think differently.

Elias, a freshman in high school, is very serious about whatever sport is currently in season. He’s always putting in extra work trying to get an advantage. (We are diligently working on getting him to apply that same enthusiasm toward his schoolwork.) Not getting enough out of school lunches or what I was packing, Eli asked if there was a way to not only get more food in the lunch box but he wanted healthier food as well. This was not a request I was expecting from a 14-year-old, especially one who shares my love for doughnuts, pies, cinnamon rolls… Well, you get the point.

I began thinking about the protein (chicken, lean beef, etc.) and how I could supply veggies that would be welcomed. I started with some simple dishes like chicken & rice, pork tacos, spaghetti (pasta made with garbanzo beans) and meatballs. These were usually things I could put together from what we ate for dinner the night before. A saving grace is that he has access to a microwave in the high school, which allowed me to be a little more creative.

Soon our oldest daughter, Sydney, and Kristin were eyeing Eli’s lunches. These two are not picky by any means, but if food is not cooked to their liking, you may often get a bit of an upturned nose. To my delight, they loved my lunch-packing as well. Thus, I found myself having to figure out how to put together three reheatable, to-go lunches for not one but three people every day.

Now, I’m sure you’ve heard of the concept of food prepping, but let me just reinforce how great it is. I cook on Sundays for the week and make lunches not only for Kristin, Sydney and Eli but for myself as well. I have made a habit of spending part of the day cooking several proteins, some veggies, a baked-good and batch of granola. It feels good knowing I can give my loved ones a little help on their busy weekdays.

You may recall we have four children. I know at least some of you are thinking I’ve completely ignored my younger two, Molly and Brahm. Well, only slightly. They ask me to make their lunch as well, but I am not yet able to give them the same treatment since they do not have access to a microwave in elementary school. I do tell them that if they’d like me to pack their lunches, I won’t pack junk.

This policy did not go over well at first, but we have evolved to a point where they are packing their own lunches with some supervision. Where Brahm and Molly tried before to pack chips, pretzels, popcorn and crackers (you know, the four main food groups according to kids), after some initial coaxing, one of the first things they look for now is even salad (!!). This might be my favorite part of our school lunch culinary adventure: seeing all my kids expanding their pallets and trying to make more conscious choices without a push from this parent.

Here are a few of our favorite dishes:

CHICKEN FRIED RICE

A weekly go-to in our house. This dish is extremely versatile. Don’t feel like chicken? Try pulled pork, turkey and kale meatballs or tofu. Don’t have broccoli or carrots? How about peas, edamame, cauliflower or asparagus? Just raid the fridge and pantry, and see what great new take on this classic dish you can come up with.

ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_23_Image_0002• Cubed Chicken

• Fried Rice

– Onion

– Eggs

– Soy Sauce

– Broccoli

– Shredded Brussel Sprouts

– Shredded Carrot

– Toasted Seseame Seed

Here, just cook as much as you want. You know your family better than I do, so I’ll refrain from telling you how much to make.

I bake chicken breasts and then cube them on Sundays. For the fried rice, I usually start with about 4 cups of rice. (I like to cook the rice on Friday or Saturday and let it dry out in the fridge for a few days.) In a wok or large saute pan, I start with a little oil and add some chopped onion. I then add in the rice and let it sit for a minute to try and crisp it up just a bit. Next, I’ll add a couple of eggs and scramble them in. Add your soy sauce to taste, and at the end, I add the vegetables. I don’t want to overcook them. I like them to still have a little bite. Last, I top it off with a little toasted sesame seed.

COCONUT/ALMOND PROTEIN COOKIES

The Kleinerts like dessert! Some of the entrees may not have been as well received if my crew did not have a little something sweet to chew on afterward. These little cookies are low in sugar and pack a protein punch. The recipe below uses dried blueberries and cherries, but if you like chocolate, substitute the fruit for chocolate chips and the vanilla protein powder for chocolate.

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• 5 T Coconut Oil

• 1/2 cup Brown Sugar • 1/4 cup Pure Maple Syrup

• 3 Eggs

• 5 T Coconut Flour

• 1 Scoop Vanilla Protien Powder

• 1 cup Oatmeal

• 1 t Salt

• 1/2 cup sliced almonds

• 1/4 cup chopped pecans

• 1/4 cup chopped dried berries

Melt the coconut oil. Mix in brown sugar and maple syrup. Whisk in eggs. In a separate bowl combine flour, protein powder, oatmeal and salt. Add wet ingredients. Mix in nuts and berries. Scoop onto cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 until the edges are brown (about 10 minutes). Makes about 18.

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Foodie Favorites

Might we suggest a few of our favorite Southern Indiana eats?
In honor of Extol’s fifth anniversary, we’ve created this round-up featuring five of our foodie favorites:

Worth the Wait
ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_17_Image_0001There’s a reason why Wild Eggs, 1450 Veterans Parkway in Jeffersonville, often has a brief wait shortly after the doors open: Everything on the menu is delicious. Try the House-Made Cinnamon Roll, Everything Muffin, Wild Mushroom and Roasted Garlic Scramble, Country Fried Steak and Eggs, POP’s Poppin’ Egg Salad or the #MOPOWERBOWL. The Bloody Mary’s are fire, too. (NOTE: If you arrive and there’s a line, don’t let that deter you. The staff is adept at quick seating. Regardless, it’s always worth the wait.)

Meat Market
ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_18_Image_0001Long-time customers know the best place to get meats – and more – is Preferred Meats, 7617 Old State Road 60 in Sellersburg. The shop, owned by Samantha Huber, regularly features unexpected items (like Wagyu beef) as well as popular picks (fresh, locally-sourced, hand-cut and -ground meats; vegetables; deli meats; sides; beer and wine). Forget milk, eggs or charcoal on the way home? Preferred Meats carries those staples, too. Unsure how to cook a particular cut, want a suggestion for your next purchase or have a question about where the meats come from? Just ask. The staff is knowledgeable and super friendly. Pop in and we’re pretty sure this will be your new go-to meat market for sure. Follow @ preferredmeatsinc on Facebook.

Olde World Awesome
ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_19_Image_0001Family-owned and -operated, Schnitzelbank Restaurant serves up “olde world” German fare that’s perfect any time of year, but if you’re specifically looking for stick-to-your ribs goodness, try the Goulash, Sauerbraten or the Grüne Spinat Casserole. The historic eatery is located at 393 3rd Ave. in Jasper.

Big Buzz
ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_20_Image_0001It’s no surprise that 1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks, 100 E. Chestnut St. in Corydon, has continued to garner much buzz since opening last year. Chef Scott Dickenson heads up the kitchen with what he calls “southern comfort fusions.” Try the Brussels Sprouts (we love the inclusion of a touch of local honey), Smoked Gouda Stuffed Meatloaf or one of the Sweet Potato Biscuits.

Membership Has Its Merits
ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_20_Image_0002Late last fall, we highlighted Board and You, a then-new business in New Albany that quickly gained a massive social media following and super fans of their custom charcuterie boards (pick up or delivery). Fast forward a few months, and now the business is expanding to Indiana, offers boards of all sizes (including gigantic tables filled with incredible edibles), and is slated to open Board and You Bistro downtown New Albany in May. Don’t want to wait? New to the concept? Like a little bit of exclusivity? The bistro, owned by Zack Flanagan and Sean Lara, is currently offering exclusive memberships that include a variety of benefits over a twelve month period, including the prominent display of your name – or your business name – in the restaurant, discounts, complimentary bottles of wine, exclusive invitations and more. Memberships range from Silver ($250) to Gold ($500) to Platinum ($1,500). For more information, contact Zack at 502.777.6516 or zack@boardandyou.com.

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BOARD AND YOU – AND FOR US, TOO

Local charcuterie board company brings flavor to the table.

IT’S A TREND that’s been sweeping both coasts and taking Instagram by storm: stunning charcuterie boards filled with premium cuts of meat like prosciutto and capocollo, hand rolled and surrounded by blueberry goat cheese, brie, hummus, multi-grain crackers, fresh grapes and chocolate-covered strawberries.

Thanks to Board & You, these mouth-watering plates are now available right here in Kentuckiana.

What started as a friendly “charcuterie off” competition between founder Sean Lara and a co-worker – who both claimed to make the best charcuterie boards for their families – turned into a fully blown business concept.

And the competition?


No two boards are alike, and each is a sensory smorgasbord designed to please both the eyes and taste buds.


“Both Sean and I are extremely competitive, so we did our research and Sean’s from San Diego and he’s very familiar with charcuterie because it’s very popular on the West Coast, the Northeast (and) some areas in Texas,” Flanagan says. “We put together this awesome board, and it looked so, so good for Easter and brought it to my mom’s side of the family. Both of my parents are one of five, so any event is no small occasion whatsoever.”bnu

Everyone crowded around what Lara describes as “a huge spread” – and Flanagan’s grandmother gets a shout out for telling the pair to put the charcuterie board on social media.

“It became the centerpiece of the party,” Lara says. “Everyone was so amazed by it, and Zack kind of looked at me and said ‘I think we have something. I think this definitely is something we can make something out of.’”

A9R3322w3_i0fc0m_39lcWith some quick research, they created Board & You as a fully formed business model. At first, Flanagan and Lara found their customers on Instagram and Facebook. They took orders for custom charcuterie boards filled with cornichons, nuts, rare meats and cheeses, fruit, candies, crackers, cookies and other delectable treats they could source locally or from vendors.


“One thing that we found during our research is yeah, there’s a lot of variety out there, but some lacked presentation and color.

– ZACK FLANAGAN


Lara and Flanagan built a web site and now create small boards for anywhere from two people up to entire tables full of creatively-designed catering goods for businesses and large gatherings.

The duo are graduates of the University of Louisville, where Lara served as cheerleader for five years and studied exercise physiology and Flanagan chose marketing as his course of study. They met almost three years ago and hit it off immediately.bnu2

“I would say the most popular cheeses that we have are our Merlot BellaVitano, our blueberry goat cheese, and the Saint-André triple cream Brie, which pairs amazingly with everything, either savory or sweet,” Lara says. “I’d definitely say those are the top three favorites.

A9R1dmht48_i0fc0w_39lcProducts are now sourced from large meat and cheese distributors, with some serving as staples and others as limited-time offerings.

“When you think of charcuterie, it’s a big, gorgeous platter of food,” Flanagan says. “One thing that we found during our research is yeah, there’s a lot of variety out there, but some lacked presentation and color. I think Sean kind of found his way with incorporating so many different colors into these boards just to make them really, really eye-popping and inviting to the guests that are grazing on them. I think that’s what helped set us apart in the beginning.”

They’re hoping to hire another staff member around February. “We’ve even had people ask if we can do something on Christmas Day, and we’re definitely not opposed to it. It’s just crazy to think that we’ve created something that’s so desirable.”


BOARD & YOU

boardandyou.com

@boardandyou

boardandyou@gmail.com

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EXTOL’S END OF SUMMER BASH

Aug. 30 • New Albany Amphitheater

Photos by Kathryn Harrington

Extol Magazine hosted its first-ever End of Summer Bash – presented by The New Washington State Bank – on Aug. 30 at the New Albany Amphitheater. Attendees enjoyed a beer and wine garden provided by Keg Liquors; food from Fistful of Tacos, Red’s Daug Pound, Smokin’ Franks Barbecue and Uncommon Cups and Cones; the opportunity to meet WHAS11 on-air talent Kristin Pierce and Brooke Hasch of WHAS11’s Wake Up morning show; and enjoy music provided by Jacob Resch Band, The Roux and The Juice Box Heroes. Proceeds from the event benefited WHAS Crusade for Children, USA Cares and Southern Indiana Housing Corporation, a nonprofit benefiting the residents of New Albany Housing Authority, particularly through their upcoming Christmas party. The after-party was held at Floyd Brewing Company, 129 W. Main St. in New Albany.

Many thanks to the sponsors of our inaugural event, including presenting sponsor The New Washington State Bank; SoIN Tourism; AllTerrain Paving & Construction; Kraft Funeral Service and Graceland Memorial Park; Clark Memorial Health | Norton Healthcare and LifePoint Health; Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County; Denton Floyd Real Estate Group; PC Home Center | PC Lumber & Hardware; A1 Porta Potty; Coyle Automotive Group; and Talon Logistics.


 


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On the Sunny Side…with Wild Eggs

Popular mainstay continues ‘eggs-ellence’ at breakfast and lunch, offers catering, too 

BY LAURA ROSS | COURTESY PHOTOS

“If you build it, they will come.” 

 

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As the classic film Field of Dreams melted that phrase into our collective consciousness, so too, have entrepreneurs taken that command to heart. 

When J.D. Rothberg and Shane Hall entered the “breakfast biz” 10 years ago in Louisville with their Wild Eggs restaurant, the idea of an upscale restaurant focused on the first meal of the day was a newer concept — but it worked. 

Ten years and 16 Wild Eggs restaurants later, people still line up every day for their carefully crafted eggs, bacon, potatoes and more. 

The restaurant’s Jeffersonville — 1450 Veterans Parkway — is one of Wild Eggs’ newest and growing locations.

“So many people from Indiana went to our downtown Louisville location, we decided to bring the eggs to them,” said Meredith Smith, marketing manager for Wild Eggs. “Jeffersonville and Southern Indiana in general are growing so much with the walking bridge and development throughout the area, we knew it was the right move for us to open a restaurant there three years ago.” 

The popular Jeffersonville location is growing with the addition of patio seating for about 20 guests coming in July. 

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Wild Eggs restaurants are now located in five spots in Louisville and Jeffersonville, three in Indianapolis, three in Cincinnati, one in Bowling Green, Kentucky, two in Lexington, Kentucky, and two restaurants in Nashville. 

Breakfast was important throughout Rothberg’s life. A native of Colorado, his great grandfather was a potato and produce farmer. “His family would often gather at his grandparent’s house for a huge breakfast, where they’d sit around and connect over eggs and potatoes,” said Smith. “He wanted to bring that connection of having a moment with your family, coupled with great service, to the restaurant.”

Rothberg came to Louisville to work with the legendary Grisanti’s restaurant group. He worked his way through the ranks to management, and later, ventured out on his own to launch the fine dining Napa River Grill in Louisville. Shane Hall eventually joined the Napa River Grill team and together, the pair sold the restaurant and focused on breakfast.


The popular Jeffersonville location is growing with the addition of patio seating for about 20 guests coming in July. 


“At the time, breakfast wasn’t as big as it is now,” explained Smith. “They wanted breakfast with a dinner feel, in an upscale, yet affordable approach. That includes fresh, creative dishes with white cloth napkins, coffee and water service at your table, fresh ground pepper and other local products, and service you’d expect from a dinner restaurant.”

Those elements set Wild Eggs apart from other breakfast restaurants now crowding the market. “We focus on the overall experience and service you receive,” she said. “There are a lot of good breakfast restaurants out there right now, but we add special touches. Our kitchen team comes in early and makes things from scratch, like our muffins, every day.”

“We also source as much food as we can locally in every market,” Smith added. “In this area, we work with Creation Gardens, Paul’s Fruit Market and Bourbon Barrel Foods, among others. We believe in keeping our fresh ingredients in the community.”

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While guests pack Wild Eggs restaurants daily, an unintended specialty of sorts arose also. “When we opened 10 years ago, there was a push for spending more quality time with your family,” said Smith. “The message was don’t have your work meetings in the evening — go home to your family. People started holding breakfast meetings here so they could accomplish that during the workday. We’re now the spot for many breakfast and lunch meetings.”

Wild Eggs also offers catering for on site meetings and events. Casual catering, as Smith explained, can feed from five to 500 people, and offers items from the core menu and other special dishes. Customers can also customize their order. The Wild Eggs team delivers and sets up the food and helps with serving suggestions and display. “We bring all the goodness of Wild Eggs right to your door,” said Smith. 

Whether it’s catering or dining in the restaurant, the quality of the food is paramount. Wild Eggs takes the basic and obvious first ingredient — eggs — and builds upon the traditional bacon ’n‘ eggs menu. “Some restaurants go crazy with cool or over-the-top recipes, but we keep consistent with things people like. You can have a really inventive recipe, but if people don’t like it, it’s not going to do anything for your menu,” said Smith. “We keep the items people love and mix it up with creative specials through the year, like our fall pumpkin pancakes, which people start asking for as early as August.”

Top sellers at all the Wild Eggs locations include the Mr. Potato Head casserole, Zax I Am Fried Eggs And…, house-made cinnamon rolls, and the spicy Kalamity Katie’s Border Benedict. Traditional omelets, pancakes, waffles, and lunch sandwiches round out the expansive menu.

“Our goal is to serve our loyal following,” said Smith, “Our warmth, friendliness and the relationships we build with our customers sets us apart and keeps guests coming back again and again. Everything these days is so fast paced and grab and go that we have that comfortable feel of servers you know who have the personal touch and will have the perfect meal for you.” 

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Interested in Wild Eggs catering your next event or gathering — no matter how large or small? Visit wildeggs.com for more information. 

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Cox’s Hot Chicken & Sports

screen-shot-2019-03-13-at-5-15-12-pmChicken, sports, beer, memories of South Side and more

BY D. TODD APPLEGATE | PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN WATSON

Normally, I try not to set expectations when I review a restaurant, especially a new one. But with my latest assignment, Cox’s Hot Chicken & Sports in New Albany, this mindset was challenged.

First, I knew it would be a struggle to walk into an establishment that, as of November, occupies the space that was once home to the iconic South Side Inn Bar and Restaurant. Second, being a lover of fried chicken, especially hot chicken and specifically Nashville hot chicken, with “hot chicken” in Cox’s name my taste buds had some preconceived and anticipatory notions as well.

Thus, on a recent Wednesday for lunch, it was impossible to enter Cox’s without reminiscing of the great food and fond memories from the legendary South Side, a mainstay in the downtown New Albany dining scene for years. (Most recently this building housed Big Four Burgers and District 22 Pizzeria.)

Interestingly, I found that the general floor plan of South Side had been maintained as I remembered. I felt like I had stepped back in time and the large “South Side Bar and Restaurant” sign in the middle dining room was a pleasant reminder that Cox’s appreciated the history also. For those of us that exited with tray in hand to the right from the South Side cafeteria line, a full-service sports bar now occupies the back wall of the former dining room. It felt welcoming and familiar but refurbished with a new look and exciting vibe.

Pleasantly appeased of my first concern and nostalgia aside, it was time to focus on the chicken.

I love fried chicken, always have, and am constantly searching for good fried chicken. Fortunately or unfortunately, fried chicken prepared in a cast iron skillet, the ideal method, in my opinion, tends to be the barometer by which all chicken is measured.

But chicken has evolved over the years, and there are now many varieties to choose from and a plethora of restaurants offering this ever-popular item. There are fried, broasted, grilled, baked, pressure cooked, and roasted preparations, and original, spicy, hot, Nashville hot, golden, Cajun and other varieties to consider. Plus, there are sauces to evaluate in the overall equation.

I applaud Cox’s for not being “chicken,” so to speak, to put its version of the fried bird out there and provide a new niche in the ever-expanding New Albany food landscape.

After looking around, I ordered three Sticky Fingers ($7.99 with one side and choice of sauce) and three Giant Drummies ($7.99 w/side). You can order six for $13.99 or nine for $19.99 as well. I opted for Mary’s Greens as one side and Mac & Cheese as the other. For starters, Alexandra, my friendly and patient server, recommended the Fried Pickle Spears with ranch dipping sauce.

While waiting for the pickles, I perused the rest of the menu and reviewed the three-page beer menu. The dining menu is divided into five sections and has something to please just about everyone, including appetizers, sandwiches (including a Fried Cod Sandwich served fish ’n‘ chips style for $10.99), sides, burgers and salads. There also is a children’s menu.

screen-shot-2019-03-13-at-5-15-18-pmThe fried pickle spears I ordered were a home run and were as crisp and firm after frying as any pickle I have ever had. The ranch dipping sauce was a perfect complement to these crunchy and munchy gems. A cold beer and these fried pickles while watching sports is enough to keep you coming back to Cox’s.

With the taste buds tantalized, out came the chicken, sides and choice of sauces served on silver trays with red and white checkered picnic paper. I immediately went for the chicken and was not disappointed. It was “hot” chicken, meaning it was served from the fryer hot and crispy. Cox’s serves their chicken original style and provides a choice of sauces (Original, Cluck, Holy Cluck, or Clucking Scary) on the side to deliver the desired heat. For sake of completeness, I tried all of the sauce options and found that they all had a base sweetness to them and slightly different flavor profile with increasing heat level. My favorite was the Holy Cluck. The Clucking Scary was certainly hot but not inedible hot and would not completely scare the bravest away.

My side of Mary’s Greens was terrific and reminiscent of the South Side greens of yesteryear.

Cooked with bacon pieces and both sweet and tart at the same time, they were delicious. I’m still pondering the mystery flavor or secret spice. Maybe a slight splash of Asian mirin and/or flavored soy? The ample portion of the Mac & Cheese side was creamy and utilized curly cavatappi as the pasta choice.screen-shot-2019-03-13-at-5-15-31-pm

The beer menu is extensive and includes both domestic and imported draft and bottled selections and a surprisingly large number of craft beers with a focus on local breweries which was good to see. Cox’s also has plenty of bourbon, spirits and wine to choose from, in addition to nonalcoholic beverages.

Next door with its own entrance is Cox’s Carry Out. It has a reduced menu featuring only chicken and sides. Incidentally, there are four tables inside the carry-out location that may be perfect for those wanting to grab a quick lunch or dinner. Both New Albany Cox’s restaurant are wheelchair accessible from the Main Street entrances.

Also, Cox’s recently opened a second location at 134 Spring St. in Jeffersonville in the former Big Four Burgers location. It will be similar to the New Albany establishment but will also feature a second-floor venture with a local brewery.

So, come meet, eat, drink, hang out, watch some sports and enjoy. It will be a party “fowl” if you don’t try it!

Tastefully, Todd


Cox’s Hot Chicken & Sports

114 East Main St.

New Albany

812.944.4032

coxshotchicken.com


Cox’s Hot Chicken

134 Spring St.

Jeffersonville

812.590.3281

coxshotchicken.com

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UP FOR DEBATE

screen-shot-2018-10-04-at-9-57-09-amPhoto by Jason Applegate

Kentucky is known for its hot brown. And fried chicken. And bourbon. In Maine, it’s all about lobsters, Maryland’s crabs and crab cakes reign supreme, Massachusetts claims the best clam chowder and you can’t beat a New York bagel or find a more flavorful green chile than you can in New Mexico. Each state clings to its claim of being known for serving up the best edible something – but what about Indiana? Spoon University and Thrillist say it’s our sugar cream pie, while Food Network and BuzzFeed maintain our breaded pork tenderloin sandwiches are the must-have dish. Help us settle the debate and tell us what is Indiana’s defining dish by sending an email to extol@extolmag.com. Just be sure to put “Extol Eats” in the subject line.