Tag Archives: Kentucky

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Foodie Favorites

Might we suggest a few of our favorite Southern Indiana eats?


In honor of Extol’s fifth anniversary, we’ve created this round-up featuring five of our foodie favorites:

Worth the Wait

There’s a reason why Wild Eggs, 1450 Veterans Parkway in Jeffersonville, often has a brief wait shortly after the doors open: Everything on the menu is delicious. Try the House-Made Cinnamon Roll, Everything Muffin, Wild Mushroom and Roasted Garlic Scramble, Country Fried Steak and Eggs, POP’s Poppin’ Egg Salad or the #MOPOWERBOWL. The Bloody Mary’s are fire, too. (NOTE: If you arrive and there’s a line, don’t let that deter you. The staff is adept at quick seating. Regardless, it’s always worth the wait.)ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_17_Image_0001


Meat Market

Long-time customers know the best place to get meats – and more – is Preferred Meats, 7617 Old State Road 60 in Sellersburg. The shop, owned by Samantha Huber, regularly features unexpected items (like Wagyu beef ) as well as popular picks (fresh, locally-sourced, hand-cut and -ground meats; vegetables; deli meats; sides; beer and wine). Forget milk, eggs or charcoal on the way home? Preferred Meats carries those staples, too. Unsure how to cook a particular cut, want a suggestion for your next purchase or have a question about where the meats come from? Just ask. The staff is knowledgeable and super friendly. Pop in and we’re pretty sure this will be your new go-to meat market for sure. Follow @ preferredmeatsinc on Facebook.

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Olde World Awesome

Family-owned and -operated, Schnitzelbank Restaurant serves up “olde world” German fare that’s perfect any time of year, but if you’re specifically looking for stick-to-your ribs goodness, try the Goulash, Sauerbraten or the Grüne Spinat Casserole. The historic eatery is located at 393 3rd Ave. in Jasper.

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Big Buzz

It’s no surprise that 1816 Modern Kitchen & Drinks, 100 E. Chestnut St. in Corydon, has continued to garner much buzz since opening last year. Chef Scott Dickenson heads up the kitchen with what he calls “southern comfort fusions.” Try the Brussels Sprouts (we love the inclusion of a touch of local honey), Smoked Gouda Stuffed Meatloaf or one of the Sweet Potato Biscuits.

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Membership Has Its Merits

Late last fall, we highlighted Board and You, a then-new business in New Albany that quickly gained a massive social media following and super fans of their custom charcuterie boards (pick up or delivery). Fast forward a few months, and now the business is expanding to Indiana, offers boards of all sizes (including gigantic tables filled with incredible edibles), and is slated to open Board and You Bistro downtown New Albany in May. Don’t want to wait? New to the concept? Like a little bit of exclusivity? The bistro, owned by Zack Flanagan and Sean Lara, is currently offering exclusive memberships that include a variety of benefits over a twelve month period, including the prominent display of your name – or your business name – in the restaurant, discounts, complimentary bottles of wine, exclusive invitations and more. Memberships range from Silver ($250) to Gold ($500) to Platinum ($1,500). For more information, contact Zack at 502.777.6516 or zack@boardandyou.com.ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_16_Image_0004

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LUNCHTIME LOVE

How to take your lunch on a culinary adventure

By Adam & Kristin Kleinert


First, please allow me to apologize. Most FamFitter articles have been penned by my wife, Kristin (aka “The Smart One”). She is in her first year as a full-time special education teacher, taking a few college courses, coaching elementary cheerleading and killing it as a mom like always. So, for now, you get me.

This even busier lifestyle we’ve taken on has given me the opportunity (sarcasm) to help out with a few more duties around the house. Aside from writing this article, one area in which I have enjoyed helping is with the kids’ lunches. When I started, my routine consisted of getting up and then trying to throw whatever I could into a lunch box. If there wasn’t time for even that, it was cafeteria lunch for my crew. This lasted until my oldest son challenged me to think differently.

Elias, a freshman in high school, is very serious about whatever sport is currently in season. He’s always putting in extra work trying to get an advantage. (We are diligently working on getting him to apply that same enthusiasm toward his schoolwork.) Not getting enough out of school lunches or what I was packing, Eli asked if there was a way to not only get more food in the lunch box but he wanted healthier food as well. This was not a request I was expecting from a 14-year-old, especially one who shares my love for doughnuts, pies, cinnamon rolls… Well, you get the point.

I began thinking about the protein (chicken, lean beef, etc.) and how I could supply veggies that would be welcomed. I started with some simple dishes like chicken & rice, pork tacos, spaghetti (pasta made with garbanzo beans) and meatballs. These were usually things I could put together from what we ate for dinner the night before. A saving grace is that he has access to a microwave in the high school, which allowed me to be a little more creative.

Soon our oldest daughter, Sydney, and Kristin were eyeing Eli’s lunches. These two are not picky by any means, but if food is not cooked to their liking, you may often get a bit of an upturned nose. To my delight, they loved my lunch-packing as well. Thus, I found myself having to figure out how to put together three reheatable, to-go lunches for not one but three people every day.

Now, I’m sure you’ve heard of the concept of food prepping, but let me just reinforce how great it is. I cook on Sundays for the week and make lunches not only for Kristin, Sydney and Eli but for myself as well. I have made a habit of spending part of the day cooking several proteins, some veggies, a baked-good and batch of granola. It feels good knowing I can give my loved ones a little help on their busy weekdays.

You may recall we have four children. I know at least some of you are thinking I’ve completely ignored my younger two, Molly and Brahm. Well, only slightly. They ask me to make their lunch as well, but I am not yet able to give them the same treatment since they do not have access to a microwave in elementary school. I do tell them that if they’d like me to pack their lunches, I won’t pack junk.

This policy did not go over well at first, but we have evolved to a point where they are packing their own lunches with some supervision. Where Brahm and Molly tried before to pack chips, pretzels, popcorn and crackers (you know, the four main food groups according to kids), after some initial coaxing, one of the first things they look for now is even salad (!!). This might be my favorite part of our school lunch culinary adventure: seeing all my kids expanding their pallets and trying to make more conscious choices without a push from this parent.

Here are a few of our favorite dishes:

CHICKEN FRIED RICE

A weekly go-to in our house. This dish is extremely versatile. Don’t feel like chicken? Try pulled pork, turkey and kale meatballs or tofu. Don’t have broccoli or carrots? How about peas, edamame, cauliflower or asparagus? Just raid the fridge and pantry, and see what great new take on this classic dish you can come up with.

ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_23_Image_0002• Cubed Chicken

• Fried Rice

– Onion

– Eggs

– Soy Sauce

– Broccoli

– Shredded Brussel Sprouts

– Shredded Carrot

– Toasted Seseame Seed

Here, just cook as much as you want. You know your family better than I do, so I’ll refrain from telling you how much to make.

I bake chicken breasts and then cube them on Sundays. For the fried rice, I usually start with about 4 cups of rice. (I like to cook the rice on Friday or Saturday and let it dry out in the fridge for a few days.) In a wok or large saute pan, I start with a little oil and add some chopped onion. I then add in the rice and let it sit for a minute to try and crisp it up just a bit. Next, I’ll add a couple of eggs and scramble them in. Add your soy sauce to taste, and at the end, I add the vegetables. I don’t want to overcook them. I like them to still have a little bite. Last, I top it off with a little toasted sesame seed.

COCONUT/ALMOND PROTEIN COOKIES

The Kleinerts like dessert! Some of the entrees may not have been as well received if my crew did not have a little something sweet to chew on afterward. These little cookies are low in sugar and pack a protein punch. The recipe below uses dried blueberries and cherries, but if you like chocolate, substitute the fruit for chocolate chips and the vanilla protein powder for chocolate.

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• 5 T Coconut Oil

• 1/2 cup Brown Sugar • 1/4 cup Pure Maple Syrup

• 3 Eggs

• 5 T Coconut Flour

• 1 Scoop Vanilla Protien Powder

• 1 cup Oatmeal

• 1 t Salt

• 1/2 cup sliced almonds

• 1/4 cup chopped pecans

• 1/4 cup chopped dried berries

Melt the coconut oil. Mix in brown sugar and maple syrup. Whisk in eggs. In a separate bowl combine flour, protein powder, oatmeal and salt. Add wet ingredients. Mix in nuts and berries. Scoop onto cookie sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 until the edges are brown (about 10 minutes). Makes about 18.

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Gabby & Brandon Jones

Sept. 28, 2019

Photos by Krystle Hiott of Krystle Hiott Photography | krystlehiottphotography.com krystalhiottphotos@gmail.com | 317.750.1897


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On a late fall afternoon, with the warm sun just peeking through the beautiful fall-tinged leaves surrounding The Old Barn at Brown County, Gabrielle Boone of Floyds Knobs married Brandon Jones of Columbus, Indiana.

The venue gave the couple everything they wanted for their rustic vintage theme. Two large, beautifully appointed cabins flank the barn, and these were rented by the couple to accommodate their wedding party.

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As the leaves rustled, Gabby descended the wrap-around wooden deck of the bride’s cabin. Designed by Mori Lee, Gabby’s gown provided the chic, eloquent silhouette she had always dreamed of. Ivory in color, with a plunging neckline and open low back, the gown flowed with tiers of alternating striped offray sheer and solid patterned satin. Gabby’s shoes were Kate Spade rose-colored velvet and pearl-studded sandals.

Always wanting an outdoor wedding, the groom was handsomely appointed in a charcoal Bonobos suit and Bruno Magli wing-tipped shoes. Brandon waited, and perhaps shed a few tears, while Gabby made her way across the beautiful, leaf-covered path and down the aisle trimmed with white pumpkins to the small congregation seated on wooden benches. The beautiful porch-like setting was the perfect location for the exchange of vows.

Following the vows, guests enjoyed a beautiful reception decorated with crystal vases, candles, peonies and baby’s breath. In addition to the customary wedding cake, macaroons, the bride’s favorite, were served.

Always looking to surprise and treat their guests, the couple chose a breakfast buffet for their reception meal. Piping hot biscuits and gravy, frittatas and bacon were just a few of the offerings with cocktail hour miniature waffles complete with individual syrup pipettes.

Gabby is a 2014 graduate of Floyd Central High School with a degree in fashion marketing, merchandising and retail management from the Art Institute of Indianapolis. Brandon graduated from Columbus East High School and holds a degree in mechanical engineering from Purdue University.

ExtolMag_31_Final_Page_25_Image_0001The couple will reside in Columbus, Indiana

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WHERE ONE DOOR CLOSES…

Made by Morgan

Creatively inspired by Ben Franklin Crafts in New Albany

By Morgan Sprigler


…Another one opens and just like that it’s Spring, bringing us a promise of sunlight, crisp air and fresh beginnings. To welcome the new season, I’m sharing with you a kid-friendly craft that incorporates a little education, too, and started – as always – at Ben Franklin Crafts New Albany. By the way, new store hours went into effect in January. Ben Franklin is open 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. If you’re ready to get down and Derby, stop in sometime soon to see the growing collection of fascinators and hats (for men too!) or talk to a staffer about creating one specially for you.

Now, let’s craft!


BEN FRANKLIN CRAFTS NEW ALBANY SUPPLIES

• Wooden hanging door

• Chalk paint of your desired color

• Cardstock of your desired color x 2

• Scissors

• Spring items of your choosing

• Hot glue gun and glue sticks

Total project cost = $42


STEP ONEExtolMag_31_Final_Page_38_Image_0003

Find some time when you and your kid(s) can go craft supply shopping together. As you are browsing, start up a conversation about seasons. Use this opportunity to test their knowledge and do a little teaching, too. Start with the wooden door. Because it has 6 “panes,” have your child(ren) come up with six different aspects of spring. Each item will eventually be displayed on your door and will remind your child(ren) what the season is all about. My girls and I settled on rainclouds made from cotton balls with rain made from blue stones, butterflies, a birds nest with eggs, flowers, birds on a twig, and a cross to symbolize Easter.

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Paint! We chose a delicate, light pink chalk paint in a spray can. However, you may use any paint you desire. I like the look of chalk paint for this project, but a flat or matte paint would be pretty as well. The red door from Ben Franklin is also very nice just as it is, if you want to skip this step. We also decided to paint our door handle gold using acrylic paint, because, why not?! Paint and then let the door dry.

STEP THREEExtolMag_31_Final_Page_38_Image_0001

Using your heated glue gun, apply glue around the perimeter of one sheet of cardstock. Apply sheet to the back of your door, covering four of the bottom panes.

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Cut your second sheet of cardstock in half and repeat step three to cover the top two remaining door panes.

STEP FIVE

Glue your spring items to the cardstock inside each pane, while talking with your child about why each one is important and/or specific to the season. Again, all of our items were purchased from Ben Franklin Crafts New Albany, with the exception of our rain clouds, which are simply three cotton balls arranged together. We also found a twig outside to use as a branch for our little birdies. Instead of items for every pane, you and your child also can paint or draw inside one or more panes or you can collect items from your garden.


Note: This door can be updated for each season by easily removing the cardstock from each pane and adding new objects. (You could even update for birthdays by choosing six of the birthday guy or gal’s favorite things.)

Variation 1: Instead of cardstock, you can use felt for the background and utilize Velcro to attach your objects instead of glue. This would make this project even more conducive to changing out with the seasons.

Variation 2: If you would rather have a centerpiece for your kitchen table or kids table, Ben Franklin carries an array of wooden boxes that would work well for this project, too. You and your child(ren) could decorate each side of the wooden box and add a floral arrangement to the top! Voila!

Happy Spring, Extol Readers!

5 Year Spread

Fast Five

So much has happened in the past five years – and we’re not just talking about the debut of Extol

BY LISA HORNUNG


It’s now 2020 and the world is looking back at the past decade, but here at Extol, we’re celebrating the past five years. So here’s a look back at some of the biggest changes in the past half-decade.

COMPUTER LIFE

The fastest changes in any era are usually in technology, and the past five years did not disappoint. Computers are getting bigger, faster, smaller and more efficient. The same can be said of our smartphones, smartwatches and smart homes and offices, which are now heading toward 5G, the first upgrade since 4G game on the scene in 2010.

Now, the technology world is regularly using artificial intelligence, machine learning, and quantum computing. Drones are used in myriad ways, and experts predict autonomous vehicles will soon be on the road more often than not. Cloud computing has become commonplace, and those pesky, easily lost flash drives have nearly become obsolete. We no longer use CDs to listen to music or DVDs to watch movies because it’s all easily accessible with streaming services.

MEATY VEGETARIAN

While meatless burgers have been commonplace for years, it’s only recently that they’ve become real substitutes for meat – and meat lovers – like the Impossible Burger, which is made of soy and tastes exactly like the burgers we crave.

The company that created it, Impossible Foods, just released Impossible Pork, allowing pork lovers to enjoy their faves without the environmental and animal consequences. More people than ever are vegetarian and vegan, a designation that in the past was considered strange and only for so-called “granola types” and self-professed hippies. Whatever your diet designation, we’re lucky to live in a time with so many options.

WE GOT APPY

It seems like everything we do is governed by apps in ways many of us couldn’t have imagined before. We can get an affordable ride at our doorsteps within minutes with ridesharing apps. We can get nearly anything delivered from restaurant food to groceries with the help of an app. We do our banking at our fingertips, send money to our friends, buy nearly anything imaginable and have it at our doors within a day or so.

We can find a date, check the weather, text a friend overseas and get near realtime driving directions with the touch of a finger or question to a virtual assistant. The cost of travel has come down with the advent of home sharing apps like AirB&B, VRBO and more. We can order plane tickets, book a train trip and video chat with our families and pets. New apps are being created all the time, and there’s no limit to what the future holds.

IN THE CLIMATE ZONE

Over the past five years, climate scientists have increasingly issued dire warnings about the state of our planet and the consequences of our actions, causing teenagers – and supporters of all ages – around the world, led by then-15-year-old Greta Thunburg, to begin school strikes to draw attention to the issue.

While not everyone has gotten on board with climate change activism, many of us have at least become more aware of the issues that face our world. That means companies, cities and individuals, even, are more likely to participate in recycling programs, eco-friendly infrastructure changes and the general health of the planet.

DIAL IN AND PHONE HOME

The overwhelming majority of Americans – 96% according to Pew Research Center – own a smartphone. While the constant connectivity can be an asset, it also can mean more alone-together time with loved ones. (Alone-together time = the periods when you’re with others but don’t interact because everyone’s noses are in their phones and it’s as if you’re each alone.) While many of us can’t and don’t want to step away from our devices for too long, there’s also a growing push to dial in to your most important relationships by dialing back on your phone use and focusing on faces, not devices. At least for a bit.

Capture

Joseph Meier Promoted to Manager at Rodefer Moss

Contact:
Kim Naville
Marketing Coordinator
812.945.5236
knaville@rodefermoss.com


Capture2NEW ALBANY, Ind., Jan. 6, 2020 — Rodefer Moss & Co, PLLC has promoted Joseph Meier to manager, effective Jan. 1. Meier works at the firm’s New Albany office and was previously a supervisor.

“Joe has been an asset to our supervisory staff and will be a wonderful addition to our managerial team,” said Doug York, President and Managing Partner. “He brings a wealth of knowledge and professionalism that is vital to our commitment to quality and client service.”

Meier has experience in both tax and attest services including not-for-profit entities. He
specializes in complex multi-state tax filings with a focus on manufacturing/distribution and
transportation industries. His expertise also includes international financial statement
conversion, rental real estate tax implications, cost segregation studies and closely held service companies.

“I look forward to my new role as a manager,” said Meier. “My clients can expect the same
dedication and service as I provide solutions for their tax needs.”

Meier received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and Accounting from University of Louisville. He is a member of Kentucky Society of Certified Public Accountants (KSCPA) and American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) where he received a Charter Global Management Accountant designation (CGMA). CGMA distinguishes accounting professionals who have advanced proficiency in finance, operations, strategy and management.

Rodefer Moss provides accounting and businesses consulting services in nine offices in Indiana,
Kentucky, Tennessee and Virginia. For more information, visit rodefermoss.com.

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Speed Across the River for Great Art and More

5 things we love about the Speed Art Museum

COURTESY PHOTOS


ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_17_Image_0001When the Speed Art Museum reopened in 2016 following a massive, three-year closure for renovation and expansion, guests were mesmerized by the changes. Today, the Speed continues to evolve into a place where great art meets great community, with a focus on exhibitions, events, film, food, and more, that draws families, art lovers, and the entire community to its iconic building.When the Speed Art Museum reopened in 2016 following a massive, three-year closure for renovation and expansion, guests were mesmerized by the changes. Today, the Speed continues to evolve into a place where great art meets great community, with a focus on exhibitions, events, film, food, and more, that draws families, art lovers, and the entire community to its iconic building.

If you haven’t visited recently, here’s a primer on some of our favorite things about the Speed Art Museum: Art for All – The Speed Art Museum is Kentucky’s oldest and largest art museum, covering 6,000 years of art from around the world. From ancient Egyptian art, to the European Masters, including Rembrandt and Monet, to modern classics and more, the Speed invites everyone to experience art for all. Thanks to a generous grant from Brown-Forman, the Speed offers free admission to all every Sunday from 12-5 p.m.

FREE Admission for IUS Students – Thanks to a partnership between The Speed and Indiana University, IUS faculty and students with a current student ID receive free admission through Aug. 1, 2022. What are you waiting for? Go now!

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Excellent Exhibitions – The Speed’s permanent collection is breathtaking in its quality and historical significance. The museum’s curators frequently rotate pieces from the expansive collection in storage to keep the art fresh and exciting as you visit time and again. The latest special exhibition on display is Tales from the Turf: The Kentucky Horse. If you love horses, don’t miss this first exhibition to examine Kentucky’s relationship to the horse through art. It features paintings, sculpture, photographs, drawings, prints, and manuscripts from Kentucky’s major private collections, all telling equine tales of Kentucky’s history with horses. Most of the collection has never been seen in public and is only on display until March 1, so hurry in for a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see this equine spectacular.

The Speed Cinema – Catching a flick takes on new meaning when you visit the Speed Cinema, which shows films you can’t see anywhere else in this area. Documentaries, independent masterpieces, foreign classics, and more are carefully curated to showcase the best in cinema.

A Museum on a Mission – In addition to the world class art, the Speed features dozens of events, tours, and activities for all ages every month. The popular After Hours adult evening event takes place every third Friday for mingling, drinks, food, music and of course, art. Each month features a different theme, with speakers, entertainment, cinema and more. Families are always welcome at the Speed, with a special focus on the tiniest visitors through Art Sparks’ hands on learning opportunities. New to the Speed are family Saturdays, with all Saturday programming focused around the family.


The Speed Art Museum

2035 S. Third St.

Louisville

502.634.2700

speedmuseum.org

HOURS

10 a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday

12 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday and Tuesday

ADMISSION

Members: Free

Adults: $18

Seniors (Age 60+): $12

Kids (Age 4-17): $12

Kids (Age 3 and under): Free

University of Louisville students, faculty, and staff: Free

Select area schools (including IUS): Free

College students with valid ID: $12

Military personnel: $12

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WANTED: MORE ZZZS

By Angie Fenton


I often joked that I hadn’t had a good night’s sleep since late May 2015 when I learned I was pregnant. But sometime this summer, as I woke up for the umpteenth time in the middle of the night with my toddler’s feet in my face and her elbows in my ribs, I realized this was no laughing matter and I was tired of being tired.

My bed was so worn it was genuinely concave, and the constant exhaustion was starting to affect me and my on-the-job production. I researched the effects of sleep deprivation and was genuinely horrified about the seriousness of this not-so-uncommon epidemic.

According to Johns Hopkins, those of us who lack sleep are more likely to gain weight, age our brains prematurely, develop heart disease, cause car crashes… The list goes on and on — and it incited a newfound determination to do whatever I could to catch more ZZZs and ensure my daughter did, too.

The first move was obvious: It was time to get a new bed for the bedroom I share with my husband (except when he’d been relegated to the couch because said toddler was in his place). And, we decided, it was also an opportunity to transition our soon-to-be 4-year-old from her first bed into something more substantial and make bedtime something we all looked forward to.

On a sunny Saturday, the three of us ventured to Schmitt Furniture and – with the help of an incredibly knowledgeable gentleman who worked there – quickly found exactly what we needed: An adjustable split king-size bed for Mom and Dad (which we could control individually), and a bunk bed with safety features for Olive, which came equipped with stairs — as opposed to a ladder — and built-in shelves under each step as well as beneath her bottom bunk.

The Schmitt Furniture duo that delivered and set up the beds were courteous, kind (they didn’t blink an eye at the incessant questions my kid kept asking) and true professionals. That night, Olive quickly took to her “big girl bed,” and the hubby and I found ourselves snoozing with ease. My only regret: Why in the world didn’t we do this sooner???

I also consulted with friends and a couple of experts, all of whom advised setting and sticking to individualized bedtime routines, utilizing white noise apps if necessary, practicing meditation and “unpacking” the day’s stressors and tomorrow’s worries whether mentally or by writing them down.

While each night isn’t perfect – Olive is currently asleep in my bed right now but that’s because she was feeling a bit clingy today wanted to “cuddle with Mommy,” which I allow as a treat (to us both, mind you) but it’s no longer the norm. Found: More ZZZs.


Schmitt Furniture is located at 101 E. Main St. on the Furniture Corner of State and Main in downtown New Albany.

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LIGHT THE HOLIDAYS

Creatively inspired by Ben Franklin Crafts in New Albany

By JD Dotson

ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_45_Image_0002The holidays are fast approaching and seem to sneak up on me every year. ’Tis the season we typically pull out all of the holiday decorations, lights, garlands and trees and cover every inch of our house in festive decor. Glitter seems to cover most surfaces, too, by the end of it despite my banning of the substance.

Intent on finding new ways to spruce things up, I took a trip to Ben Franklin Crafts in New Albany, which had my head spinning with thoughts of updating my festive decor, but I was on a mission.

I had a conversation with a friend who wasn’t going to decorate this year citing a super-busy schedule leading up to a holiday vacation, so he wouldn’t be home enough to enjoy it. There have been years when my decorating was minimal and years when the sparkle was over the top, but I had a hard time imagining nothing. This issue’s craft project stemmed out of that conversation.

The craft could definitely serve as a centerpiece or a mantle, but I also wanted it to suffice as a holiday scene for someone in a small apartment, dorm room or beautiful gift that’s sure to spread some Christmas cheer.

The beauty of this project is that it can be customized to your own unique slice of life. Switch the bunny out for a deer, or the lovebirds for cardinals. Add a couple of tall skinny trees and a less rustic fence. There is no shortage of options roaming the aisles of Ben Franklin and plenty of room to create your own personal scene.


SUPPLIES:

Lantern

Ribbon and greenery wire

Sprig of greenery

Small tree

Beads (for ornaments)

Elements in the scene: bunny, birds, fence

A bag of snow

Elmer’s Glue

Long craft paintbrush

Glue gun and glue sticks

Materials provided by Ben Franklin Crafts & Frame Shop

420 New Albany Plaza | New Albany

benfranklinartsandframing.com


ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_46_Image_0002STEP ONE

Start with the tree. I took turns with red and green “ornaments” (they’re actually beads) to evenly distribute. Want to ditch the traditional red/green color combo? Do it! Hot glue your favorite color ornaments all over your little tree. I am usually pretty particular about excess glue all over, but in this case, the glue looks like ice and icicles and fits in perfect with the scene. Next, carefully wind your lights up the tree starting at the bottom and finish at the top. Make sure to leave a bit of wire left to reach the inside of the top of the lantern.

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STEP TWO

ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_46_Image_0003Glue everything down. Start with the tree and don’t be afraid of being heavy-handed with the glue gun — it’s all getting covered in snow. Once the tree is anchored, I glued the battery pack into the top of the lantern. With the lid closed, it will be hidden. Just make sure to position the opening mechanism so battery changing is easy. Add all your elements — bunny, fence, birds, deer, whatever — your imagination has dreamed up and glue them into place.

STEP THREE

ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_47_Image_0004Let it Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Before you let loose your powerful snowstorm, use a paintbrush to paint a bit of glue to things that would naturally catch a bit of snowfall if they were real-sized. I brushed the glue on the posts of the fence before the big storm started, so that they caught some of the flakes on the way down. You want a good amount of accumulation on the ground, but not enough to call off school.

STEP FOUR

ExtolMag_30_FINAL_Page_47_Image_0005Accessorize! I wired a big, hand-tied bow on top, green with red velvet accents, pulling in some colors from my ornaments and added a bit of snow-covered greenery. The selection of ribbon and greenery accessories at Ben Franklin is staggering, so mix it up and bring your own taste into your scene. Then, tie away… unless you need some help. I have a confession, dear readers. I ran into Ben Franklin co-owner Kristy Dunlap-Smith who tried to teach me how to make the perfect bow. I took the ribbon home and made some not-so-perfect, pretty awful bows. So, I used Kristy’s sample as the bow for my final project. You can easily use a pre-made bow or have one of the super-helpful people at Ben Franklin help you out. It is the season of giving, after all.


Whether you are surrounded by twinkling lights and up to your ears in decorations or enjoying your tiny slice of festivity, I hope your holiday is full of love and kindness.

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Business 101

Michelle Konkle, CFP® Financial Consultant with a Local Financial Strategies Firm


What motivates you?

The first thing that comes to my mind is my daughter. I am motivated to create the best life possible for her. In doing that, I am thankful for my career which has allowed me to have flexibility and a work life balance. These things motivate me to create a bond with clients which allows me to be able to participate emotionally in their financial victories.

What is the biggest professional risk you’ve taken?

Simple stated, being a woman in a predominantly male industry. Whether we want to believe or accept the reality, there are very few women in a financial advisor or C suite position within an organization; yet more times than not we end up in charge our family’s financial well-being. I am thankful to be on a team that values the different way of thinking which I bring to the table. They have given me the opportunity to face my fears and overcome the obstacles that I had put in my own way.

What is most rewarding about what you do for a living?

The biggest reward in my line of work is helping individuals to create and achieve financial freedom. I love being able to see the smile on their face after several conversations and assurances that their hard work has paid off and their financial goal has been met. This of course means different things to different people – it could be paying off student loans, buying your first home, or being able to retire years earlier than you had ever imagined!