Tag Archives: soin

ko

A Beautiful Adventure

Koerber’s baubles make every
life event a keepsake

Photos by Danny Alexander
Model: Jacquelyn Koerber
All jewelry available at Koerber’s Fine Jewelry

MAKE A STATEMENT. TELL THE WORLD. FIND A SUBTLE WAY TO SAY, “I LOVE YOU.”
KOERBER’S FINE JEWELRY HAS A KEEPSAKE FOR EVERY BUDGET AND LIFE ADVENTURE.


Koerber’s Fine Jewelry
3095 Blackiston Mill Road
New Albany
812.945.5959
koerbersfinejewelry.com

lla

LESLIE LEWIS & ASSOCIATES INTERIOR DESIGN OPENS THE SHOP

JEFFERSONVILLE INSTITUTION NOW OFFERS BOUTIQUE HOME GOODS SHOPPING

Leslie Lewis & Associates Interior Design (LL&A) officially opened The Shop on March 26 at LL&A’s Jeffersonville location with a grand opening and ribbon-cutting.

The Shop is a boutique that’s filled with home accents and accessories, with new items arriving daily.

LL&A puts the “fun” in “functionality” and is known for the team’s creativity, innovation and client service.

247 Spring St.
Jeffersonville
812.282.6640
leslielewisdesign.com
Facebook: @llainteriordesign

37

GO WITH THE FLOW

 

adam

HENRYVILLE’S ADAM KLEINERT FINDS BEAUTY IN MISTAKES AND TURNS THEM INTO GEMS

By Mariah Kline
Photos by Christian Watson

Adam Kleinert has no idea what to expect.

The talented artist, who has made a name for himself as a sought-after graphic designer whose clients include both local and national companies, recently began a foray into jewelry making.

“The nature of the beast is learning to find the beauty in the mistakes,” he said quietly, a smile behind his words. “It’s about embracing imperfection, but you should talk to my wife about that.”

Kleinert laughed at the double entendre but turned the focus to wabi-sabi – a Japanese ideal that has been Westernized to essentially embody the concept that nothing is perfect and there is beauty in that – which is something he has embraced personally, professionally and artistically.

Born into a creative family, Kleinert began drawing at a young age and says his parents consistently encouraged him to pursue his passion. He majored in fine art and graphic design at
Ball State University, where he studied painting, printmaking, ceramics and sculpture after first attending Hanover College where he played baseball, though his heart was always in aesthetics.

a0“We couldn’t use the computer for graphic design until our junior year,” recalled Kleinert,
whose work was quickly noticed and admired by his professors and peers.

“Everything had to be hands on. We were using computers, but they still wanted our work to have a fine art feel to it and think with our minds instead of thinking with a computer. Even after we could start using computers, I did quite a few projects all by hand because I enjoyed it.”

Years later, Kleinert – who co-writes Extol Magazine’s FamFitter column with his wife,
Kristin, and also serves as the publication’s creative director – enjoys expressing his artistic talents in various mediums.

“It’s always whatever hits me or inspires me,” Kleinert said. “Sometimes, I’ll paint, sometimes I’ll draw. I’ll do live drawings on Facebook, and I do a comic (sometimes live on Facebook) every
week. I just do whatever I can to release all of my creative juices.”

On his Facebook page – Adam Kleinert Workroom – followers can find the adorable and hilarious comic “Poco & Mo,” which was inspired by one of his daughters and her pet goat,
as well as several of his other projects. The latest undertaking he’s shared is handmade jewelry
crafted with resin and barn wood.

The wood I’m working with now came out of a barn in Charlestown,” he said. “The beams are probably 150 years old or more, and the barn has been torn down since. (The jewelry) has a true Southern Indiana history to it, and it’s almost like a little piece of history you’re wearing.”

Kleinert said he devised the method for making the pieces by accident.

“I started playing with (the wood) for another project, but as I cut into it, I found all these holes.
Mother nature and time had just destroyed this wood but in a beautiful way to where there are
holes and gaps,” he said. “It’s just been eaten at and deteriorated by pests and bugs and everything through the years. Then, I started thinking about this resin and playing around with it, so it just kind of came naturally after that, and I turned it into pendants and earrings.”

Kleinert has since perfected the process, which requires a great deal of patience. While it is admittedly painstaking, he appreciates the experience.

“With this jewelry, the resin and the wood, I don’t know what’s going to happen when I pour
it because I can’t see inside the wood until I cut into it and get to see these beautiful colors and
shapes. So, I don’t even know how much I’m actually doing there. It’s more that mother nature
did all the hard work,” Kleinert said.

“YOU CAN MESS IT UP AND IT STILL TURNS OUT IN A BEAUTIFUL WAY. THAT’S WHAT I LIKE ABOUT JEWELRY MAKING: BEING CREATIVE AND LETTING WHATEVER COMES OUT, COME OUT.” –Artist Adam Kleinert

“YOU CAN MESS
IT UP AND IT STILL
TURNS OUT IN A
BEAUTIFUL WAY.
THAT’S WHAT I LIKE
ABOUT JEWELRY
MAKING: BEING
CREATIVE AND
LETTING WHATEVER
COMES OUT,
COME OUT.”
–Artist Adam Kleinert

As sole owner of Hatch Design Co., a graphic design company, Kleinert said, “I have my design work where I plan and collaborate with clients, which I thrive on, and I appreciate those partnerships and structure.”

The artist lives in Henryville with his wife, four children and several furry family members in a rural setting, all of which feeds into his creative and energetic spirit on every level.

“I have a lot of family around and it’s always a blessing to have that. And I like being out in the
country,” he said. “I think I draw a lot of inspiration from that as well. I’ve never really thought about it before now, but I think the small community and kind of being out in the open inspires me.”

And, with his new foray into jewelry making, he has experienced a newness he didn’t expect.
“It can be more free-flowing,” said Kleinert. “You can mess it up and it still turns out in a beautiful way. That’s what I like about it: being creative and letting whatever comes out, come out.”

Adam Kleinert’s jewelry is available at
Regalo, 562 S. Fourth St. in Louisville or via @
AdamKleinertWorkroom on Facebook

 

 

wed1

Wedding Watch

Now that you’ve said, “I do,” why not share your special day with Extol readers? We’re seeking brides and grooms who want to give a glimpse of their big day in the pages of our magazine. There is no cost for this multi-page feature, but there must be a Southern Indiana angle.
We love sharing photos from the nuptials and receptions and encourage participants to name the vendors used.
If you are interested in seeing a wedding beautifully highlighted in Extol, send an email to extol@extolmag.com and include “Wedding Watch” in the subject line.

36

THE FAMILY COMPOUND: WHY IT WORKS FOR US

Our resident family explores a close-knit life


We’ve mentioned before that we live very near our extended family.

The word “near” may be an understatement in our case.

You see, in reality, it’s something closer to “on top of” or even “all up in the business” of that family.

Some of our friends think we’re a little crazy, and some folks have even questioned our decisionmaking skills, but the truth is, it may well be the most sound decision we’ve made.

In any case, it’s become fundamental to our entire way of life, and we feel certain that all parties involved are reaping rewards. We field questions about it so often we decided to share why it works for us.

Our little slice of Southern Indiana heaven holds four dwellings and four generations: greatgrandparents, grandparents, parents and children. Together, we share the same address, the same mailbox and the same driveway, though, of course, the sharing runs much deeper than just simple physicalities.

36

There’s always someone to hang out with when your family lives next door.

Between us are deep-seeded understandings and shared philosophies, common interests and
collaborated ideas.

This may sound rather utopian and unrealistic. So, in the spirit of full disclosure, we’ll admit to
the struggles as well.

Obviously, there is very little privacy.

For instance, we all know who comes and goes, and at what hour, etc.

Obviously, there is very little privacy.

For instance, we all know who comes and goes, and at what hour, etc.

Next, there are disagreements that naturally arise

The inhabitants here are a group comprised of particularly big personalities with strong opinions. We are not always on the same page in every matter, and this can be tricky at times.

And finally, as humans living in close proximity will do, we annoy each other from time to time.

Things don’t always get put back in the proper places, people aren’t always in the same mood as the others around them, child-rearing strategies sometimes differ. No, it’s not TV-sitcom perfection 100 percent of the time, but the benefits are so vast, we never regret them.

The sheer logistics of being so near make it wonderfully convenient. Say, you’re cooking a meal and need an ingredient, doing a project and don’t have the right tool, or moving something heavy and need a hand. There are three other households full of folks absolutely willing to help
out or lend an item at any time.

Next, immeasurable is the value of the village in which we are raising our children.

In our quiver are eight adults who love our kiddos and are able to shower them daily with wisdom, discipline and time. There is never a shortage of caring family members to share a story, help with schoolwork or reign down a little discipline. No bike tire goes unfixed, no injury
untreated and no indiscretion unnoticed.

When our Sydney received her driver’s permit, she had many more opportunities and individuals from whom to learn than her most of her peers.

Numerous occasions that warranted late night ER visits have been made much less stressful due to willing babysitters who could be there at a moment’s notice.

And when the younger kids and their cousins leave toys and sports equipment laying all over
the property, there is always a concerned relative at the ready to teach a lesson and supervise the clean-up.

Then, there’s the love between us, which supersedes any and all discord that has ever arisen here.

We don’t tolerate each other. Rather, we appreciate one another. We know we’re blessed to have this opportunity, and we choose to embrace this life every day. We look forward to continuing to raise our children in this manner, and, if we’re lucky, eventually a grandchild or two. Hopefully, we won’t drive the other family members on-site crazy in the process.


So, how do our kids feel? Here are their responses to questions we asked them about growing up so close to extended family:

QUESTION #1: WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST ABOUT LIVING
WHERE WE LIVE?

BRAHM, 8:

“I always have someone to play with me and there’s always something cool to do. Papaw works outside and wants me to work with him, Uncle Cole lets me ride four wheelers and dirt bikes, and Ryder (his cousin) will play in the mud anytime you will let us. And Nanny has a LOT
of snacks.”

MOLLY, 11:

“I’m so glad we live where we live because I feel like it’s the safest place on earth. Everyone who lives here loves each other, and everyone would protect us no matter what. There’s always someone around to know we’re safe and also to help us with stuff.”

ELI, 14:

“It’s never boring here. We always have cousins to play with, friends visiting, people working on something or doing something outside. I love the family meals and the holidays and get-togethers. I love that I get to see my grandparents, aunt and uncle and cousins every day. Most
people I know don’t get to do that. I know I’m lucky.”

SYDNEY, 16:

“I just like having everyone around. It feels great knowing I have so much family surrounding me all the time. Everyone takes care of each other here and I know there’s someone to help me if I ever need it. This is a perfect place to grow up.”

QUESTION #2: IS THERE ANYTHING YOU DON’T LIKE?

SYDNEY

“I guess if you want privacy, this isn’t a great place to get it.”

ELI

“Sometimes, there’s an awful lot of people to lecture me.”

MOLLY

“If I get in trouble around here, everyone seems to know about it.”

BRAHM

“Nothing. I really love it all.”

 

13

5 TIPS TO GET FIT THIS SPRING

IF THE THOUGHT OF SWIMSUITS AND WARM WEATHER HAS YOU BUGGING OUT, RELAX AND TAKE A DEEP BREATH. THEN, TRY ONE OF THESE QUICK TIPS FOR SPRUCING UP YOUR COMMITMENT TO GET FIT (OR FITTER) THIS SPRING.

LOCATE YOUR MOTIVATION.

Do you love watching the sunrise? Does walking around dusk make you feel good? Or are you a lunch-time workout warrior? Don’t force yourself to adopt a certain time to work out – go with your gut and your preference. Sure, morning people can morph into night owls and vice versa,
but if you want to save yourself a bit of misery, find the time that works best for you, and then stay committed to it.8

CLEAN IT UP.

It’s that time of year again when many of us feel a deep-seated need to clean our homes from top to bottom and everything in between. So, use the labor in your quest to get fit. Make doing chores a game and compete with yourself to see how fast you can complete a job. Work up a sweat. Incorporate squats and lunges as you clean. Finish a task and then do 10 push-ups or a set of jumping jacks. Just move while you clean. You’ll burn calories and have a sparkling abode
before you know it.9

USE THE BUDDY SYSTEM.

Surely, someone in your stratosphere is interested in getting fit, too. Make a commitment to one another to join a class or take regular walks or runs. Working out with others is always more fun and you get the bonus of holding one another accountable, too.10

GO MARKETING.

Seeking a reason to overhaul your diet? Incorporate frequenting your local farmers markets into your weekly routine. The big, beautiful bounty farmers sell at the markets make eating healthier a treat. If you’re unsure how to use or cook a particular item, just ask. It’s a rare farmer who won’t give you his or her best tips.11

SET A GOAL. AND A BIG ONE.

What if you committed to getting fit over the next 12 – yes 12 – full months? How different would your life be than it is today? Want to, say, run the Derby Festival miniMarathon in 2020 but haven’t even incorporated regular exercise into your life? No worries. Set small goals. Reward yourself when you make progress. Then, get back at it again. In one year, you could be looking in the mirror at a whole new you on the inside and out.12

38

At First Blush

Madison boutique brings Paris fashions to Southern Indiana

PHOTOS BY PATIENCE DEAN • PATIENCEDEANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

 

Blush on Main, one of Southern Indiana’s premier boutiques, hosted “Paris Couture,” a fashion show, March 2 at Rembrandts Gallery & Wine Bar in Madison.

The annual fashion spectacular featured runway-worthy styles, including imported Milan styles. The sold-out show has become known for its music, fashion and fun, and garners rave reviews.

Blush on Main, which is owned by Mary Beth Boone, sells upscale clothing, Derby hats , accessories and gala gowns with spot-on style sessions and offers a unique experience through its sister company, The Fashion House, an attached AirBnB. This allows for the ultimate shopping destination, particularly if you opt to stay for the weekend. Guests have the opportunity to be pampered by a stylist and choose from several services at the on-site salon, and enjoy meals prepared by a chef and fresh flowers from French Tulip Florist.


Blush on Main

113 W. Main St. Madison
812.273.7000
Facebook: @blushonmain

43

PAPER PLATE DERBY HAT

Hats off to the best time of the year

Creatively inspired by Ben Franklin Crafts in New Albany

By Morgan Sprigler


Derby Season is upon us, yall! Now, I’m no BritniKnable from HeadCandi (if it’s even possible that you don’t know Britni, google her RIGHT NOW!).

But, I have discovered that I am capable of making a hat out of a paper plate. My little girls throughly enjoyed participating in this craft, so this idea is super-kid-friendly.

I can see you creating these for your Derby house party, displayed on a table for your guests to wear for the day. I can also see this as a craft station set up for children and adults alike, if you plan on throwing a Derby themed event, or just something fun to do at home with your kiddos. Some of these items you may already have on hand, although I always get mine from Ben Franklin Crafts New Albany.

SUPPLIES:

1. Paper plates or bowls (solid white and sturdy)
2. Ribbon, flowers, feathers, rhinestones, etc
3. Hot Glue Gun
4. Scissors3940

STEP ONE

Poke holes (carefully) using your scissors evenly at both sides of your plate. This is where you will string your ribbon through, eventually, that will hold the hat in place on top of your head.


41STEP TWO

Using your hot glue gun, attach ribbon around the perimeter of the plate. Once you have completed this step, you can decorate your “hat” any way you would like. Attach a flower or two, add feathers or really anything your heart42

STEP THREE

Once you are happy with your design and all of your glue is dry, cut a long piece of matching ribbon. Take the end of the ribbon and string it through the top of one of the holes you created in step one and through the bottom of the other hole. Pull the ribbon through so that you have an even amount of excess on both sides. Approximately 10 inches.


STEP FOUR

Place the hat on your head ( I like how it looks if its tilted to one side) and tie underneath your chin. Now, you are Derby party ready!

Wishing everyone lots of luck this Derby season! Go Baby Go!43

Peter Pan

Let Us Entertain You

Peter Pan

Peter Pan

Derby Dinner Playhouse Celebrates 45 Years

BY LAURA ROSS | PHOTOS COURTESY DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE

LEE BUCKHOLZ, producer and artistic director at Clarksville’s Derby Dinner Playhouse, surveyed the darkened theatre-in-the-round he’s called home for more than 30 years. “Forty-five years is a long time for any theatre to succeed,” he mused. “But we have not only succeeded, we’ve thrived.”

Derby Dinner Playhouse opened its doors in 1974, as part of a plan by area businessmen who wanted to build a convention, sports, and entertainment complex in Southern Indiana. Today, the sports complex is long gone, but Derby Dinner Playhouse remains and is more popular than ever.

We want to celebrate our 45th anniversary,” said Buckholz. “It’s exciting to think about the fact that of all the theatres that have closed in the last 10 years, it’s really remarkable how well we’re doing here.”

Derby Dinner Playhouse entertains approximately 220,000 people a year with a budget of nearly $7 million. With a record 10,500 season subscribers on the main stage and over 3,000 children’s theatre subscribers, Derby Dinner is now one of the most successful dinner theatres in the country.

While dinner theatre as a concept is more limited these days, in it’s heyday, dinner theatres drew large crowds, eager to see former stars in shows that featured light comedies, tried-and-true musicals and inexpensively produced shows.

In the late 1970s, Derby Dinner began the “Star System” – using retired TV and movie stars such as Mickey Rooney, Van Johnson, Dorothy Lamour, Jerry Mathers, Bob Denver and Sid Caesar as cast members.

Those days are gone. Today, Buckholz and his company produce eight main stage shows, four Children’s Theatre shows, 12 concerts and offer a Performing Arts Academy and summer camps each season.

Caesar Romero

Caesar Romero

MAKING IT WORK

A key to the theatre’s success is how it adapted to the times and listened to its audience. “Things have changed,” said Buckholz. “In the last 10 years, we’ve doubled our season ticket subscriptions, and the show selection and production quality has gone up.  I travel to New York, Atlanta, Charlotte and Chicago to bring in talent, and we utilize the incredibly strong arts talent base in Louisville.”

“This area is an attractive draw for performers,” he added. “It’s not uncommon for someone to come in and do a show and still be with us ten years later. It’s a surprise to them. They’ll sign a contract out of New York, then arrive here and like it and want to stay in the area. That’s an amazing opportunity for them because, as an actor or singer, the minute you start a show, you’re looking ahead to the next show and next paycheck.  The fact that we’ve kept a lot of our talent shows we’ve found a nice balance between our performers, our audience who gets to know them, and the high quality of our productions.”

Cary Wiger should know. He arrived at Derby Dinner Playhouse as a young actor and “Barnstormer” singer in 1985 and never left.  A fledgling career as a high school biology teacher quickly faded away once Wiger dove into his Derby Dinner life, which now includes acting, singing and working in corporate sales.

Dinner theatre in general has changed over the years,” Wiger said. “When it started it was a lot of the silly comedies, and smaller shows, but it built our audience. The joke was if a theatre was struggling, throw in ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ because it draws an audience and fills the coffers.”

But over the years, Derby Dinner built that audience into a large subscriber base that allows the theatre to be more adventurous with its shows. “The audience knows us and trusts us to entertain them with quality shows,” said Wiger.

The intimate in-the-round setting and pre-show Footnote musical program (formerly called “Barnstormers”) allow actors to interact with patrons and get to know their audience. Wiger laughed, “A few years ago, I had Lasik surgery. When I’d take my glasses off on stage it was just a blur, but when I came back for the first performance after surgery, I could see faces and it scared me! It changed my perspective. Seeing and getting to know them made a difference.”

Mickey Rooney

Mickey Rooney

Many of the positive changes at Derby Dinner came under the guidance and leadership of Bekki Jo Schneider and Carolyn Thomas, who purchased the theatre in 1985. The pair worked tirelessly to build the theatre into the success it enjoys today. Thomas retired about a decade ago, and Schneider died in 2018 after a long battle with cancer. The theatre is currently run by Buckholz, and Cynthia (Cindy) Knopp, general manager and co-owner.  Knopp is also Thomas’ daughter.

I’ve been here since I was 13 and I’m nearly 60 now,” Knopp said. “I followed in her footsteps through high school and after, then later came back when my mom was ready to retire. You can always find ways to do things more efficiently, but the basic principle works here, and we are good at it.”

Knopp is not sure what the magic potion is, but points to the family atmosphere among employees and even customers. “We genuinely care for our customers, our employees, and our community. One of the things my mom taught me was you always should learn as much as you can in every opportunity you’re given, and I try to do that. That’s what brings me joy.”

Steel Magnolias

Steel Magnolias

THE SHOW MUST GO ON

The 45th anniversary season kicks off in May with the southern comedy of manners, “The Savannah Sipping Society,” and includes special performances of “Shrek The Musical” in July, “Million Dollar Quartet” in August and a Christmas treat of “Elf the Musical” in November and December. Derby Dinner’s traditional mystery slot includes a new take on the classic “Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery” in October, and the hit Broadway comedy “Boeing, Boeing” will tickle audiences in January 2020. Buckholz is thrilled to round out the beginning of 2020 with “Saturday Night Fever” in February, and the well-loved “Anything Goes” to end the season in April 2020.

“We’ve wanted to do ‘Saturday Night Fever’ for years,” said Buckholz. “It is already selling like crazy, and sales for ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ are off the charts as well. Our 45th anniversary season is so exciting. There isn’t one show in it that’s ‘the’ show to see. They are all such blockbusters in their own way.”

The season will also include shows in the popular children’s theatre, summer classes and the Performing Arts Academy. Tina Jo Wallace, another long-time actor, singer and now Children’s Theatre director, sees the results of decades of community support.

“These are often the children of our subscribers, who were themselves the children of our original subscribers. These kids have grown up around us and who knows what it could spark in their lives,” said Wallace. “We’ve had many children come back later as actors or staff, and we’re grooming the next generation of patrons and performers.”

“We show them what theatre is,” added Wallace. “So, if we show them non-professional schlock, then we’re failing them. If we show them great, focused, exciting work, they realize that and appreciate it. We might be a child’s first exposure to theatre, and that’s a great responsibility.”

Buckholz knows Derby Dinner Playhouse is one of many competitive players in the talented Louisville and Southern Indiana arts scene. “It’s not so much about being super competitive, because. we’ve all sorta found our niche and we fill that well,” he said. “The amount of theatre options we have for people in a city of this size is amazing. But, there are things that set us apart from the Louisville arts scene.  Of course, we are proud to be in Southern Indiana. We have free parking. We feed you. We entertain you.  Our price point is so remarkable and a great value. Derby Dinner Playhouse offers a complete experience and is a full evening for less than you’d pay just to see a show in downtown Louisville.”

“I’d put the quality of our actors, professional staff and shows up against anyone,” he added. “We’ve reached the point now that the quality you see at Derby Dinner Playhouse is the same as the quality at the Kentucky Center for the Arts, Actors Theatre, Pandora or anywhere in the area.”

The anniversary season will be bittersweet, following the recent passing of Bekki Jo Schneider. “One of the things she said to me before she died was, ‘I want you to take this theatre and move it forward,’” said Buckholz. “I took that to heart. While the 45th anniversary will be a love letter to Bekki’s life, it’s also Derby Dinner’s new steps forward.  It will be easy to celebrate her instead of being melancholy. She would want a good show. We’re not looking to change the world, we’re looking to entertain.  And, that’s what we are going to do.”

Gary Burghoff

Gary Burghoff


JUST A MINUTE

A minute with Lee Buckholz, producer and artistic director, on the 45th anniversary season at Derby Dinner Playhouse.

“THE SAVANNAH SIPPING SOCIETY” 

LEE BUCKHOLZ: “This show is so funny and harkens back to good, old southern women.”
A laugh-a-minute comedy about four Southern women, all needing to escape their day-to-day routines, who are drawn together by fate – and an impromptu happy hour.
MAY 22 – JUNE 30

“SHREK THE MUSICAL”

BUCKHOLZ: “How fun is this? This is a show for kids and kids at heart. Everyone loves Shrek.”
Everyone’s favorite ogre is back in the hilarious fairy tale adventure based on the Oscar-winning, smash hit film.
JULY 3 – AUG.18

“MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET” 

BUCKHOLZ: “This will be fantastic. It’s a bit of a jukebox musical but plays so well and brings back so many great memories.” 

Broadway’s hit rock n’ roll musical inspired by the electrifying true story of four young musicians who gathered at Sun Records for what would be one of the greatest jam sessions ever.
AUG. 21 – SEPT. 29

KEN LUDWIG’S  “BASKERVILLE: A SHERLOCK HOLMES MYSTERY”

BUCKHOLZ: “Everyone loves a mystery, and this one has great, smart writing and comedic moments. It’s a fun take on a classic story.” 

Sherlock Holmes is on the case and must crack the mystery of “The Hound of the Baskervilles” before a family curse dooms its newest heir. A murderously funny adventure!
OCT. 2 – NOV. 10, 2019

“ELF THE MUSICAL”

BUCKHOLZ: “Elf is going to blow the doors off this theatre. It’s a huge, fun, show, with a big cast. If you loved the movie, you will love this show. It’s a blockbuster.”

Based on the hit movie, “Elf” is the hilarious tale of Buddy, a young orphan child who mistakenly crawls into Santa’s bag of gifts and is transported back to the North Pole.
NOV. 13 – DEC. 31

“BOEING, BOEING” 

BUCKHOLZ: “It’s been about 10 years since we’ve done this show, and we have many cast members returning for this super fun show.”

This hit Broadway comedy is filled with chaos, matchmaking, and mayhem!
JAN. 8, 2020 – FEB. 16, 2020

“SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER” 

BUCKHOLZ: “We’ve wanted to do this show since it became available several years ago. It has been rewritten several times as it was performed across the country and we’re at a point right now where the rewrite is great. And, the music in it – just, wow.”

This energetic musical adaptation of the ’70s classic film is the story of a talented, streetwise kid from Brooklyn who attempts to escape his dead-end life through dancing. Featuring many disco-era hits by the Bee Gees.
FEB. 19, 2020 – MARCH 29, 2020

“ANYTHING GOES”

BUCKHOLZ: “I just love a great big, classic musical and this is one of my favorites. There’s so much in this Broadway revival: great costumes, fantastic tapping, and, you can’t go wrong with Cole Porter.”

Music, dance, laughs, and the age-old tale of Boy Meets Girl. A hilarious shipboard romp wrapped around one of Cole Porter’s most magical scores. Critics call it “A delightful, delicious and de-lovely Broadway musical!”
APRIL 1, 2020 – MAY 17, 2020

Derby Dinner Playhouse

525 Marriott Drive
Clarksville
812.288.8281
derbydinner.com

Run for Your Wife

Run for Your Wife

Web of Murder

Web of Murder

The Little Mermaid

The Little Mermaid

 

ae

‘Every Day Is A Good Day’

17Exploring like an Angel

We sent our Explorer JD Dotson to Angel’s Envy in Louisville

PHOTOS & STORY BY JD DOTSON

Every day is a good day for a bourbon distillery tour in Kentucky. Angel’s Envy is a heavenly one.

The urban distillery, which is located in downtown Louisville, brings something new and wonderful to the table (or the bar, I should say).

Science was never my strong suite in school. I didn’t understand a lot of it, or didn’t find much interest in it. Angel’s Envy Distillery is like a GIANT science class come to life, and I couldn’t be more fascinated in the process.

It is amazing to me the precise percentage of corn, rye and barley mixed with yeast and science and time, going from one place to another, starting out as one thing and becoming something completely different ¬–parts separated and distilled in a giant copper tube and run through with heat and cooling – to become something else, which is then put into a specific type of barrel to sit around in and become yet again something different and wonderful.

It’s exhausting, yet completely captivating.

My wonderful tour guide met me at the retail shop to begin my tour. She had to coax me away from the stores shelves showcasing Angel’s Envy’s beautiful bottles and glassware and T-shirts. We headed up the elevator to begin our tour, and entered the massive operations room full of pipes and giant tanks and the most amazing smells wafting around your head.

Angel’s Envy Distillery tour takes you on a full bourbon-making experience, from concept through every stage of the process and the final product in the bottle.

The tour began with the story of Lincoln Henderson’s history in the bourbon industry to the family-run business of the Angel’s Envy brand, and the purchase and redevelopment of a long-vacant downtown building.

The fascinating history lesson finishes and the science class begins.18

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We walked the path at the top of impossibly large tanks, sounds and smells
whirring about our heads in a massive room called the Cathedral.

We indulged in the dry ingredients and the precise percentages of corn, rye
and malted barley milled and mixed into giant tanks to ferment.

My lack of understanding of how science works would like to think about
this whole process as magic.

At this stage, something magical happens to the mixture.

It became beer and worked its way through giant tanks toward the room
at the end of the great hall.

Inside was a 35-foot column copper still separating the beer into a gas and
a liquid as it ran through the heated elements. The gas was then returned to
clear liquid form and ready to be transferred to barrels.

The clear liquid was matured in charred 53-gallon, American White Oak
barrels for four to six years.

Angel’s Envy goes a step further with double-maturation for up to an
additional six months in 60 gallon port barrels from Portugal. The Angel’s Envy
Rye can spend an extra 18 to 24 months in Caribbean rum barrels. Both of
these extra processes set Angel’s Envy apart and give them their unique tastes.

The tour took us through the complex bottling section of the distillery, where
the bottles are filled by machine and each bottle is inspected for color and fill
and labeled by hand. Located within the bottling warehouse is the bottle your
own area where you can arrange to fill a specially-designed bottle yourself.

Check the website to reserve a bottle designating your own tasting experience.
Angel’s Envy currently fills 80 barrels a day, until a week after my tour when
they will go into 24-hour production and double their output.

The end of my tour took me back upstairs with a guided tasting of Angel’s
Envy paired with an Orange Chimere chocolate truffle created for Angel’s
Envy by local chocolatier, Art Eatables.22

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My tour was filled with so much amazing magic from my wonderful guide, the facility and my tasting, I had to end my day with the Angel’s Envy-version of an Old Fashioned, the award-winning Henderson, in the private bar adjacent to the tasting room.

Some notes to know before you go on a tour at Angel’s Envy Distiller:

Wear appropriate footwear. No heels or open toe shoes.

Pictures are allowed, but no flash photography.

Be aware that some areas are not climate controlled and could be hot in the summer months.

Tours are $20 per person and last about an hour.

Check the website or Facebook page and pre-book tours: They sell out far in advance.


Angel’s Envy Distillery

500 E. Main St.
Louisville
502.890.6300
angelsenvy.com

Visit the Distillery

TOURS RETAIL
Monday 10am-5pm 10am-5pm
Tuesday closed 12pm-5pm
Wed-Thurs 10am-5pm 10am-5pm
Friday-Sat 10am-6pm 10am-6pm
Sunday 12:30pm-5:30pm 12:30pm-5:30pm