Tag Archives: Extol

Talented baker
Lydia Sprigler.

Letter From the Editor | June/July 2018

By Angie Fenton   

The Extol Team is thrilled to have Lydia Sprigler as the subject of our featured cover story. The winner of MESA’s Kid Baking Contest, Lydia wowed the judges with her sweet skills and will be the guest of honor at our launch party, which is 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. June 21 at MESA, 216 Pearl St. in New Albany. Attendees of the free, family-friendly event will get a chance to enjoy Lydia’s baking and other appetizers at this edition of our signature event. We hope you’ll join us. By the way, if you have a budding young baker in your family, Food Network contacted MESA KIDS (coming soon to New Albany) and asked for help finding talented kids ages 8 to 13 to cast for season 5 of the network’s Kids Baking Championship show. You can find more information at www. mesakidscookingschool.com.

Talented baker Lydia Sprigler.

Talented baker
Lydia Sprigler.

In this issue, we remember and celebrate the life of Bekki Jo Schneider, who made Derby Dinner Playhouse a must-visit Southern Indiana institution. We are grateful to Jon Huffman and Arts-Louisville.com for allowing us to share his tribute to Bekki Jo.

It has been enjoyable watching basketball standout Romeo Langford mature into a young man who is preparing to head to Indiana University. We caught up with the Hoosier for a quick Q&A and photo shoot at The Pepin Mansion, where he, once again, displayed why he’s a fan favorite on and off the court.

Romeo Langford with fans Elliott Baker, 7, and his sister Eve Baker, 5.

Romeo Langford with fans Elliott
Baker, 7, and his sister Eve Baker, 5.

Amid the articles and columns about summer fun, food, exploring Southern Indiana (and beyond), sports, fitness, fashion, home renovation and philanthropy, you’ll also find several though-provoking first-person pieces. Zach McCrite shares an honest account of his recent 80-pound weight loss. Ray Lucas imparts the wisdom he learned from his father. Guest contributor Amy Gesenhues gives a glimpse of her family’s 100-year garden. And Miranda McDonald details a recent trip that includes coming to terms with what it means to be divorced.

Many thanks to our advertising partners for their support, which allows us to remain a free publication. And, all of us at Extol greatly appreciate you, our readers.

 

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HELPING HANDS

screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-22-06-amPhoto by Angie Fenton

      Just before Derby, a great group of volunteers of all ages joined the Extol Team to provide dinner to those who are served by Exit 0, a homeless outreach based in Southern Indiana that was founded by Paul and Michele Stensrud. If you’re interested in joining us – we’ll serve again soon and on Thanksgiving and Christmas – send an email to angie@extolmag.com. Learn more about Exit 0 atjesuscaresatexit0.org or follow @jesuscaresatexit0 on Facebook.


TIP: EVEN THOUGH IT’S BASED IN LOUISVILLE, METRO UNITED WAY ALSO BENEFITS SOUTHERN INDIANA – AND THEY NEED YOUR HELP TO CONTINUE THEIR WORK. THERE ARE NUMEROUS WAYS TO GIVE, ADVOCATE OR VOLUNTEER. GO TO METROUNITEDWAY.ORG TO LEARN HOW.

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Serving With ‘Charity and Kindness’

screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-29-05-amTri Kappa Inc. Has Benefited Indiana Community Since 1901

BY LISA HORNUNG | PHOTOS BY CHRISTIAN WATSON

TAMMY PERSINGER, now a retired teacher and real estate agent, kept hearing women at work talking about Tri Kappa. “What is that?” she asked. “How can people get involved?”

One day, Persinger received an invitation in the mail to go to a meeting where she could learn more about this mysterious organization. She’s been a member for eight years now and loves it.

Tri Kappa is a philanthropic sorority for women in Indiana, with 247 chapters all over the state. It’s not like a traditional sorority in which you join as a college student, but you do have to pledge and be initiated, similar to other women’s groups. “You approach someone who is already a member and get information about it,” Persinger said. “We really look for people that have that giving spirit.”

Persinger is a member of the Floyd County chapter of Kappa, Kappa, Kappa Inc., along with Kerry Nicolas, a real estate agent who has been a member for 25 years.

“I like it because we’re giving back to the community, and it’s strictly philanthropic,” Nicolas said. “So, all we do is have fundraisers to give back.”

Tri Kappa was founded by some young college women in Indianapolis in 1901. They decided their organization’s purpose would be “charity and kindness,” which the organization still follows today. When the ladies dispersed to their homes after college, they formed chapters, which helped the organization spread throughout the state.screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-29-13-am

Today, the organization works to raise money for charity, culture and education. At the end of each fiscal year, they dole out funds for scholarships and grants to other non-profit organizations. The Floyd County chapter gives out about $5,000 a year in scholarships and about $5,000 to $6,000 a year in grants to charities and arts organizations. Last year, they were able to give grants to every group that requested funds, Persinger said. The group also helps support Riley Children’s Health in Indianapolis, and they have made blankets and “puppy pillows” for kids as they come out of surgery.

Tri Kappa raise money through various events throughout the year, including their annual gala in February, as well as selling macaroni and cheese at Harvest Homecoming. They also do service projects that don’t involve raising money, such as painting swingsets at a park and giving the residents of a retirement community a “spa day” complete with shoulder massages and nail painting.


LAST YEAR, WE WERE ABLE TO GIVE GRANTS TO EVERY GROUP THAT REQUESTED FUNDS.

–TRI KAPPA MEMBER TAMMY PERSINGER


The women also enjoy the sisterhood that comes alongside the philanthropy. “We have people from all different backgrounds, all different races, all different cultures, all different religions and occupations,” Persinger said. We’re a very diverse group of women. It’s just been interesting to get to meet everybody and get to network with them. We just get together and have fun, and in having fun, we make money to give back to the community.”

For more information, visit trikappa.org.

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Strength in Numbers

Michelle Konkle, Denise Konkle, Dave Poe

Michelle Konkle, Denise Konkle, Dave Poe

Dozens of women banded together May 9 for Women Build 2018 benefitting Habit for Humanity Clark & Floyd Indiana.

Each Women Build home was funded and built by women leaders and volunteers in our community.

The volunteers work together to raise funds and the walls for the entire Women Build project. For each build, Habitat for Humanity relies on at least 10 women to be team leaders and each recruit up to 10 women for their team. Together, they raise funds and help make up the volunteers needed to construct the home by recruiting friends and family to support their work through a peer-to-peer fundraising campaign.

If you are interested in volunteering for the next Women Build, please call 812.948.1235 or email amy@habitatcfi.org.screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-34-39-am

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A Day of Fun & Philanthropy

screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-39-50-amA team from German American recently spent time at Rauch, Inc., a community that supports people with disabilities and their families. During their visit, the team provided a refreshing spruce up to their landscaping and enjoyed a day full of fun and smiles at the Rauch community.

To learn more about Rauch, go to http://rauchinc.org.screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-39-59-am

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THEY HAVE THE MEATS – AND MORE

screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-11-44-10-amPhoto by Christian Watson

     Fans of Preferred Meats in Sellersburg swear by the shop’s fresh, hand-cut selection – but they also know the local establishment carries far more. In addition to meats for every taste, this family-owned business also has everything from vegetables to spices, sides, sauces, craft beer ’n‘ wine and charcoal, too. It’s become one of the Extol Team’s go-to places for deli meat and anything you’d want to throw on the grill. Preferred Meats is located at 7617 Old Hwy 60 #3 in Sellersburg. The one-stop-shop is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Follow @preferredmeatsinc on Facebook.


TIP: WANT TO KNOW IF THE SLAB OF MEAT YOU THREW ON THE GRILL IS DONE? TRY A COOKING THERMOMETER FOR A NO-FAIL TECHNIQUE YOU CAN TRUST.

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Into the Mountains

A Journey of Loss And Acceptance in Wyoming

STORY & PHOTOS BY MIRANDA MCDONALD

“Are you meeting someone in Jackson Hole?” inquired the lady sitting next to me on the plane.

I wondered if she was genuinely curious or simply making conversation because she felt as anxious as I did about the turbulence currently bombarding our tiny aircraft.

“No,” I choked out as I tightly gripped the arm rest of my seat. At this point, my stomach felt like it was permanently lodged in my throat. “I am actually spending the week alone.”

“Oh. What brings you to Wyoming?” she continued. Her confusion now momentarily replacing the fear.

As I looked down at the backpack wedged between my feet, I thought of the list of possible answers I could give her: a failed marriage, the two years of utter confusion that followed, or I could describe the overwhelming guilt I carried with me every day since the moment I decided to leave my old life behind.

“I am here to hike in Grand Teton National Park and do some writing.” I decided to keep it simple.

“That sounds nice,” she replied. “Be sure to take some bear spray and try to find other hikers to walk with on the trails. They say groups of three are best!”

I wanted to tell her it wasn’t the bears I feared. I wanted to explain to her that I was embarking on a spiritual journey with this trip, and that I hoped to unpack all that guilt I had strapped on my back so many months ago and leave it on those trails in the mountains.

Besides the wildlife tour I had booked two days prior to my departure, lightening my mental load was the only thing I had really planned for the trip. Oh, but there was the minor detail of finding a place to sleep for three nights. I had thought about pitching a tent. However, once I discovered the temperatures dipped down to the 30s when the sun went down, I decided to book a stay at a Heart Six Ranch in Moran, instead.

My Arrival

Like the city itself, which has a population of just under 12,000 people, the Jackson Hole airport was small. Well, small enough for it to nestle comfortably at the southern base of the Grand Teton mountain range. As I stepped off the plane and onto the tarmac, I counted the snow-covered mountain caps directly in front of me. The mountains were unlike any I had ever seen.

“I hope you enjoy your stay in Wyoming,” the lady said with a smile as she walked by with her luggage rolling noisily behind her.

I watched her walk quickly ahead of me and into the airport. She had been so kind, and yet I had never bothered to ask her name. I was thinking of our interaction on the plane when my thoughts were interrupted by the sound of another plane flying overhead. I guess names were irrelevant at this point. It was time to gather my luggage and pick up my rental car.

Twenty-Six Miles

Even though the temperature was only 50s in Wyoming that day, I rolled down every window in my rental so I could take in the spring air rolling off the mountains. I quickly typed the address to Heart Six Ranch into Google Maps, and it informed me that I only had 26 miles to travel from the airport. However, what Google didn’t mention was that I would be driving through a national elk refuge that housed 25,000 acres of wildlife, or that I would also encounter some of the most beautiful views of the Grand Teton mountains during my commute.

By the time I reached Moran, I had parked to take pictures at almost every turnabout on the highway, stopped twice to allow elk to cross the road and watched a moose graze in a small creek that was just a few miles away from the ranch. Somehow, I turned my 30-minute journey into four hours of sightseeing.

When I finally reached Heart Six Ranch, the sun was going down, and I was welcomed by a furry, four-legged “ranch hand” named Leo. His body stiffened and he began barking as I got out of my car. As a peace offering, I let him sniff my hands. I guess he found my smell acceptable because once he was finished, he walked with me to the lodge for check in. I had been in Moran for less than an hour and had already made a friend.

A Cup of Coffee

The next morning, I loaded my backpack with water, a journal, my camera and a book, and walked over to the main lodge at the ranch. I needed guidance on which trails to hike while in the national park. Leo was sprawled out and still asleep on the couch by the front desk, but the property manager was already up and reading the local newspaper behind the counter.

“I was told I need a big can of bear spray for my hike,” I said as I slung my bag onto the desk. I hoped a little humor would be a good way to start a conversation so early in the day.

“Of course, but how about some coffee first?” he asked.

As we walked into the dining room, the smell of eggs drifted from the kitchen and into my nose. With our coffee in hand, we sat at a large table made of beautiful, tan wood. It matched the logs that constructed the entire building and all the cabins on the property. I sipped my coffee slowly and hoped it would help me shake off the fogginess from another sleepless night. I seemed to be having quite a few of those lately.

“So, what brings you to Wyoming?” he asked.

“I want to hike the trails by the Grand Tetons, and hopefully do some writing,” I explained.

“Oh, you are a writer,” he said with as much enthusiasm as he could muster up before 8 a.m. “What will you write about?”

I picked my mug up and took a large drink of the hot liquid inside. “Divorce,” I explained after the coffee was fully down. Something about his presence made me feel comfortable enough to finally say it. “Well, not just divorce. I want to start figuring out who I am after divorce.”

“I see,” he replied.

“I was recently laid off from my desk job, so my schedule just got a lot more flexible,” I responded with a sarcastic tone as I played with the loose string hanging from a seam in my jeans. “I don’t own a home. I have no kids or even a dog. My marriage is over and there is no significant other that claims me. Oh, and my landlord just sold the house I am living in. So, here I am.”

“I see,” he replied again. “So, you are a gypsy?” His tone made the words sound more like a declaration than an actual question. “At this point in your life, you don’t have anything tying you down to one place,” he continued. “You, my dear, are a gypsy.”

I had never thought about this title before. Of course, I had been labeled many over the years: sister, writer, spouse, friend, coworker and now there was the heavy title of ex-wife. However, this one – gypsy – was completely new to me. I wasn’t quite sure how I felt about it, but I sat there for a moment and imagined myself trying the word on like a new pair of gloves. In my head, I pictured myself slowly pulling these gloves up over my fingers and then onto my wrists. Looking down at them as they covered both hands, I wasn’t quite sure how they fit.

“Now, about that bear spray,” he said after a long moment of silence.

Lake Taggart

After a few recommendations from various sources, I decided to hike the trail to Taggart Lake first. I was informed the walk was under 5 miles and boasted spectacular views of the park.

Once I arrived at the starting point, I laced up my hiking boots, tightened the straps on my backpack and wrapped a denim jacket around my waist. With a can of bear spray also hanging from my belt strap, I started my journey to the lake.

Even though it was May, there were still mounds of snow covering parts of the path. Eventually, I came upon a bridge that had an extraordinary view of a small waterfall. I slowly walked onto the narrow apparatus, and with water rushing over rocks of all shapes and sizes below me, I sat on its edge and dangled my feet over the side.

I thought about why I was there. I forced myself into these woods in search of something that would help me finally move forward and out of my current mental state, but I still wasn’t quite sure what that something was. I guess I was hoping it would meet me somewhere on the trail.

After sitting for a few moments, I realized the answers I searched for were not on that bridge, so I got up and started walking again.

I hiked a mile before I reached a small clearing. The trees were sparse in this area, and the snow was deep. I had only come across a few hikers that morning, but there was still a large path of footprints showing me the way to a part of the woods where the trail picked back up. The sun bounced off the snow with such ferocity that I was forced to shield my eyes with one hand as I walked. Once I reached the next set of trees, the temperature took a noticeable drop. I was getting close to the lake.

After a few minutes of walking through more snow and trees, I came to another clearing and stepped out onto a bed of pebbles. I then looked up and before me was a frozen Taggart Lake and an astonishing view of the Grand Tetons behind it. I walked to a fallen tree at the edge of this frozen body of water, and after a few minutes of stunned silence, I sat down to journal.

This is what I wrote:

At some point after my divorce, I came to believe that I deserved to be punished for hurting a person that I loved for so many years. Even if our 12-year relationship needed to an end, the guilt I feel from leaving my marriage consumes me every day. I still see the pain in his face and the fear in his eyes when I told him I had to leave. I still hear sadness in his voice when he told me not to go. The memory is just so vivid in my mind.

I have allowed this memory to block all the good memories that came from my marriage. I have allowed this memory to put a halt to any happiness that has tried to enter my life since that day. My failed marriage has made me also feel like a complete failure.

However, as I sit in front of something so grand and pure, I realize that there is so much beauty to be seen in this world. I have to start making space for this beauty. I have to unpack this guilt and leave it at on the edge of this lake.

I sat on the shore of Taggart Lake for what seemed like an hour. It was so peaceful in this spot that I could hear the silence fill the space around the trees behind me. Tears rolled down my face as I sat in the silence.

Before I started my journey back, I walked to the edge of the lake. There were a few inches of shallow water that had thawed under the warming rays of the sun. Dipping my fingers into the cold water, I tried to imagine the entire ecosystem that existed just below the surface. There was so much life sitting under that ice and it was just waiting for everything to melt so that it could finally reveal itself. Was I like this lake? Was I also waiting for a new season to arrive so that I could finally reveal a metamorphosis that was slowly taking place just underneath my own surface?

I’m Not Good at Goodbyes

After three days of soul searching on the trails of the Grand Tetons, it was time for me to catch my flight back home. I woke up early to see my last sunrise at Heart Six Ranch. As I watched the sun peek over the valley below the lodge, I wished I had booked my stay for longer. Leo must have known I would be leaving soon because he came to sit down beside me around the time the sun was almost completely above the ridge.

“I am not good at goodbyes,” I said to the French Mastiff as I rubbed a spot behind his ear. Besides a small group of bison I stopped for every day while driving back and forth to Jackson Hole, Leo and the ranch manager were the only regular contacts I made while in Wyoming. Most of my days were spent alone, and in silence.

A few more minutes passed before I walked to my cabin to gather the luggage I packed the night before. Leo followed closely behind. I picked up my backpack. It seemed so heavy when I first arrived, but now it felt a bit lighter. I guess I had accomplished lightening my load after all. This made me smile.

“Where will you go next, Gypsy?” the manager asked as I started to walk to my car with my luggage, Leo my faithful escort.

“Everywhere. I will go everywhere,” I declared with a feeling of confidence I hadn’t felt in some time.

After all, I was now a gypsy and there is just so much world to see.

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COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SOUTHERN INDIANA SHARES 2017 HIGHLIGHTS

screen-shot-2018-06-05-at-12-05-48-pmThe Community Foundation of Southern Indiana (CFSI) has made a meaningful difference in the community since 1991 and 2017 was no different.

The vision of CFSI is to be the partner and trusted resource for philanthropy in the community, providing stewardship of charitable intent so the impact of generosity will last for generations. By focusing on three core areas – community leadership, grants and scholarships and personal philanthropy – the organization is able to address needs and make lasting impacts.

Among the highlights over the past year: CFSI fundholders granted more than $4.4 million last year; that funding to area nonprofits helped those organizations serve 72,000 people in Clark and Floyd Counties. In 2017, CFSI distributed 133 scholarship awards with a combined value of over $600,000.

To learn more about Community Foundation of Southern Indiana – including how you can help – please visit cfsouthernindiana.com.


Board of Directors

The members of the Board of Directors of the Community Foundation of Southern Indiana assure the Foundation’s resources are used efficiently and effectively to accomplish their vision and mission.

Chair: Phillip Beaman

Vice Chair: Bill White

Treasurer: Adam Naville

Secretary: David Hussung

Immediate Past Chair: Gary Banet

4108 Charlestown Road, New Albany | 812.948.4662 | CfSouthernIndiana.com


KYLE VUONG

Bette Bennett Hammond Memorial Scholarship Recipient and Fulbright Research Grant recipient studying in Geneva, Switzerland.lab-photo

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Pints & Union, a ‘Real’ European Public House, Set to Open in June

BY KEVIN GIBSON | PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN WATSON

pu-2Joe Phillips nearly gushes when he talks about Pints & Union, his forthcoming project that will soon open in downtown New Albany.

As someone who longs for the European-style pub – not the local bar or brewery featuring tap takeovers and weekly craft beer releases – he will find escape within the environs of the new public house. He believes others will too.

It will be a place of reflection and conversation, with twice-weekly beer discussions over pints of Guinness and Fuller’s London Pride with beer director Roger Baylor, other discussion groups, art and more.

“It will be a public house – like, a real one,” Phillips said.

The circa-1880 space certainly will look the part, with exposed brick and wood accents, ornate chandeliers, mix-and-match furniture, and even a vintage pay phone (yes, it works). An upstairs loft will overlook the main bar area, complete with ornate railing. The bar is 30 feet long, while the space totals roughly 2,000 square feet.

Originally a general store known as the Yankee Doodle store, the building was for years a bar called Love’s. The space has been completely gutted and renovated, so it won’t bear a resemblance to its predecessors.

There will be traditional bar and pub-style seating upstairs and down, but there also will be lounge areas, not to mention a fire place, a true staple of a European public house. House music will lean toward British, with themed playlists on weekends. Upstairs, there will be a small library for those who want to simply sit and read. The collection of décor and seating will be organically eclectic.

“I’m spending a ridiculous amount of time at auctions, finding chairs like you’d see at grandma’s house,” Phillips said. “Pub seating should be personal, not impersonal.”

He said the menu will be succinct, with six to nine core items and other rotating specials based on season and availability. As many ingredients as possible will be sourced from the nearby farmers market.

“We want to go down there and grab a handful of stuff, and when it’s gone, it’s gone,” Phillips said. He wouldn’t reveal the core menu but described it as “internationally-inspired street food.”

In fact, Pints & Union will be open on Saturday mornings while the market is open for the stray shopper who wants to step inside for a pint. Sundays will feature a “hangover menu” – “Our version of brunch,” Phillips said – while Wednesdays will feature $10 select bottles of wine and raclette, a Swiss dish made up of seasonal pickles, bread, vegetables and sausages, topped with warmed cheese.

“It’s approachable and no one is doing it,” Phillips said. “You can’t lose. It’s (really) good.”

Baylor’s beer list will feature staples Anchor Porter, Bell’s Two Hearted Ale, Pilsner Urquell, Weihenstephaner Hefe Weissbier, Upland Champagne Velvet and Thomas Family Winery cider, as well as the aforementioned Guinness and Fuller’s. Several rotating tap lines will be filled by seasonal craft and import beers. About 20 or so import bottle selections will be available as well, and there will be a full bar for those who prefer an Irish whisky or some other spirit.

When it’s all said and done, Pints & Union will strive for accessibility to anyone who happens to step inside. Not a place to watch the big game, the public house will cater to those who want discussion and education.

Phillips said he expects to do a soft open sometime in mid-June, with a public opening immediately afterward. Hours will be 4 p.m.-midnight Tuesday through Thursday, 4 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Friday and Saturday, and 11 a.m. to whenever on Sunday.

“If it’s banging at 10 (at night) on a Sunday, we’ll stay open,” Phillips said.

Pints & Union is located at 114 E. Market St. in downtown New Albany, not far from the city’s bustling restaurant and bar scene, such as the popular Gospel Bird, Exchange Pub + Kitchen, Hull and High Water and more. But Phillips promises his new establishment will be a different animal.

“We’re just going to do fun stuff, have fun,” Phillips said. “Be Bohemian.”

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Summer Fun Series

SUMMER FUN

If you’re like us, you’re ready for summer, and we’ve got you covered if you’re looking for things to do. From young ones to adults, check out these options for enjoying the warm weather months while exploring and enjoying our community.


CAVE COUNTRY CANOES

812.365.2705

cavecountrycanoes.com

Forget the wifi. But you will find a better connection when enjoying Cave Country Canoes. Located 40 minutes west of Louisville, you’ll experience an amazing day on Blue River. Plan a trip – they offer excursions for individuals 3 years of age and up – and make it a point to enjoy this spring or summer.


FRENCH LICK WEST BADEN

812.936.3418

vflwb.com

Ready to create memories with the ones you love? Visit French Lick West Baden. Whether you want to bathe an elephant at Wilstem Ranch, enjoy sunset cruises on Patoka Lake or get outdoors and explore, the opportunity to create memories awaits.


HISTORIC ROCKPORT

812.649.9147

lincolnpioneervillage.com

One of Southern Indiana’s true gems of living history, this quaint river town has so much to offer. Visit the Rockport Lincoln Pioneer Village & Museum, 928 Fairground Drive in Rockport, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May through October.


JASPER INDIANA STRASSENFEST

jasperstrassenfest.org

Jasper Strassenfest has grown to become a premier festival in the region thanks to the foresight and dedication of the first committee who laid the groundwork of showcasing civic pride and German roots while providing a downtown venue to allow area not-for-profits to build fellowship and raise money for reinvestment in the community. Mark your calendar now for the 40th Annual Jasper Strassenfest, which will occur Aug. 2 through Aug. 5.


LOUISVILLE ZOO

502.459.2181

Louisvillezoo.org

There’s so much to enjoy at the Louisville Zoo, including a fabulous LEGO BRICKS exhibit created by Sean Kenney. This family-friendly venue is a jewel in Louisville that attracts people from around the region. Plan your visit today.


RED SKELTON MUSEUM

812.888.4184

redskeltonmuseum.org

Start your day with a laugh at the Red Skelton Museum of American Comedy in Vincennes. The museum honors the legacy of a man who touched numerous lives through his comedic talent, great works, compassion and commitment to public service and is a testament to the impact one man can have on the lives of others. Save the date: The Red Skelton Festival is 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 21.