Tag Archives: art

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Made by Morgan | A DIY Tradition

By Morgan Sprigler

TRADITION, AS DEFINED IN THE OXFORD ENGLISH DICTIONARY, IS “A BELIEF OR BEHAVIOR PASSED DOWN WITHIN A GROUP OR SOCIETY WITH SYMBOLIC MEANING.” CAN YOU THINK OF A TRADITION YOU HAVE CARRIED ON FROM YOUR PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS OR ANYONE SIGNIFICANT IN YOUR LIFE? I CAN THINK OF SEVERAL, AND WHEN I DO, SO MANY MEMORIES FLOAT AROUND IN MY HEAD. EACH ONE LEAVING ME WITH A SWEET FEELING OF NOSTALGIA.

Last year, I decided I would begin my own tradition for Thanksgiving dinner. My family loved it (or at least pretended to). I’m sure you have seen the Pinterest instructions on how to create a sharpie plate, mug, etc. Well, I borrowed this idea and went another direction with it.


Supplies: 

White Ceramic Plates (Dollar Store/Big Lots)

Porcelain Marker (I used Vitrea, which worked much better than a Sharpie. Let dry before baking.)

Oven (Bake at 300 for 40 minutes)


screen-shot-2017-09-25-at-5-51-19-pmWith a porcelain marker, I created a large dinner plate for each family member, filled with words of affirmation, accomplishments and successes for the year. They read something like this, “Before you fill your belly, let me fill your head! This year, you celebrated 32 years of wedded bliss.”

To be placed on top of the dinner plate, I created a salad plate with each family member’s monogram and some little, gold dots.

The evening of Thanksgiving dinner, I decided turn my project into a guessing game! As I was setting the table, I mixed up the monogram salad plates to be placed on top of the dinner plates. By going around the table, each person read the dinner plate aloud, and we all guessed who the plate belonged to. This was such a fun way to recognize each other and celebrate our successes as a family!

At the end of the evening, I wrapped up everyone’s plates and sent them home to be enjoyed throughout the year. (They’re dishwasher safe!)

The holidays are about to sneak up on us, dear readers. I urge you to create a tradition if you don’t already have one. Family memories are priceless!

XO,

Morgan

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A Treat for Teacher

By Morgan Sprigler

The thought of sending my firstborn off to preschool in a few short weeks has me feeling all the feels. For two mornings a week, she will be in someone else’s care, learning and growing without me, making new friends and becoming her own little person (cue the ugly cry). I am equally as excited as I am terrified at the idea. For those of you with several years of sending your children off to school under your belt, I commend you.

So, for the woman who will bear the weight of schooling my toddler (who, up until this point in her life, has been the boss), we have made you a vase out of pencils. Same, Same?

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-11-16-11-amMATERIAL LIST

• Smooth, round vase

• Pencils

• Glue gun

• Glue sticks

• Ribbon

• Fabric flower

• Letter to teacher

• Envelope

• Scissors

• Floral sticks

• Floral tape

• Faux apple

• Card holder

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-11-16-16-amStep One – Glue

Choose a vase that is the same height as a pencil or a bit shorter. Begin adhering pencils around your vase with a line of hot glue, alternating the direction each time. Genevieve participated by handing the pencils to me once I laid each line of glue. Be sure that your pencils are even at the bottom to keep your vase level.

Step Two – Jazz It Up

Genevieve chose a burlap/lace ribbon and a pretty ivory fabric flower to wrap around the center of our vase (like mother, like daughter). Have fun with this part. The options are endless! Simply glue the ribbon around the center of your pencil vase and adhere your flower in the center.

Step Three – Type a Letter

The letter we composed to Genevieve’s teacher, Mrs. Jamie, will come in handy throughout the year because we gave her a little bit of homework by asking her to fill out a few questions about her favorite things. Her answers will help me surprise her with gifts of thanks during the school year. We used the same ribbon we chose for our vase to decorate the envelope, and finished off the back with a cute little button.

screen-shot-2017-08-05-at-11-16-05-amStep Four – Flower Shopping Spree 

This was our favorite step of this project. We traveled to Nance’s Floral Shoppe to choose the perfect arrangement for our teacher. Mr. Brian was kind enough to allow Genevieve to select any flower she desired and even took the time to teach her how to put it all together. He was a great teacher, and Genevieve was a natural.

Step Five – Finishing Touches

Once we arrived home with our beautiful flowers, we decided to add some final touches. Using floral tape, we secured a few pencils to our floral sticks and placed them inside of our arrangement. With a Sharpie, I wrote the initials of Genevieve’s new school on the front of our faux apple and then secured it to a floral stick using hot glue before adding it to the arrangement. Finally, we placed our card inside of the card holder. Ta-da!

We hope Mrs. Jamie loves her vase as much as we loved making it. Don’t forget to tag me with photos of your creations on Instagram – I’m @ Mrs_Sprigler. Wishing everyone a happy and healthy school year!

XO 

Morgan

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PRESS RELEASE | Louisville Bespoke to host internationally recognized fashion designers

Contact Information:

Name: Yamilca Rodriguez

Mobile: 513.884.6508

Email: Louisvillebespoke@gmail.com

 

 

Press Release:

LOUISVILLE, February 15, 2017. In recent years, Louisville has transformed into an intersection of the creative and entrepreneurial. The forefront of our city’s popular destinations and businesses involve art, music, food, and very soon: fashion.

On March 24th, the inaugural Louisville Bespoke Fashion Show will bring together both local, national, and internationally recognized designers in a celebration of designer talent from around the city. This presents a unique opportunity to meet and mingle with designers on the forefront of fashion at local and global levels. The lineup will feature internationally renowned designers including Gunnar Deatherage of Lifetime’s Project Runway seasons 9 & 10, and Lifetime’s Project Runway All-Stars season 4. Other attendees will include Louisville stars such as singer Shania Robinson.

The idea is the brainchild of former Proctor and Gamble executive, Yamilca Rodriguez. In her words, “A community creates a fashion mecca with collaboration between members of the community, artists, designers and dreamers and even local government. Louisville is a modern city that welcomes diversity, creative talent, and fashion.” She then quotes Coco Chanel, “Fashion is not something that exists in dresses only. Fashion is in the sky, in the street, fashion has to do with ideas, the way we live, what is happening.”

Founder Yamilca created Louisville Bespoke to raise awareness and activity in the fashion community in Louisville. “The vision of Louisville Bespoke,” she says, “is to provide a studio space and classroom space with sewing machines and worktables for designers, artists, and entrepreneurs to collaborates and share ideas.”

Join us for the Inaugural Louisville Bespoke Spring Fashion Show, celebrating the local fashion community and its designers. The money raised will go towards sewing machines and sewing equipment.

The current list of designers and artists is as follows:

The event will be held at 7pm on March 24th at the Louisville Speed Art Museum. Tickets are still available at www.louisvillebespoke.com, but selling fast. General Admission is $35, and Reserved Seating is $55. VIP tickets are available for those interested in attending the pre-show cocktail party.

PRESS RELEASE | Louisville Gay Men’s Chorus Announces Its First Themed Season

For the first time since its 2013 inception, the Louisville Gay Men’s Chorus has announced its first themed season.  The 2016-2017 LGMC season, “The Celluloid Chorus” will kick off on Saturday, December 17, 2016, at the Ursuline Arts Center at 7:30 PM with the choral concert,  “An LGMC Holiday TV Special”, a nostalgic collection of some favorite songs from holiday TV programs from long and not so long ago.  The season continues with “LGMC Presents a Movie Musical”, a cabaret-style show featuring beloved movie songs.  This performance will take place Saturday, February 25, 2017, at 7:30 PM at Play Dance Bar.  The season concludes on Saturday May 13, 2017, at 7:30 PM at Ursuline Arts Center.  “LGMC Goes to the Movies” will be a choral take on songs from the movies.  Tickets for all shows are $10.  They can be purchased at the door.  They can also be purchased several weeks in advance of each show, online or by contacting a chorus member.
Phillip Morgan, Artistic Director, notes that “[i]t was the perfect time for LGMC to conceive of a season of connected shows.  We have grown so much as a chorus that we are in a place to plan that far in advance and really give our audience something to anticipate.”  Chair of the Membership Council Shane Clay Smith adds “[w]e are incredibly grateful for the community support from local businesses for their generous invitations to perform at their locations, sponsorship of our concerts, and fundraising opportunities.  We are especially honored by the support of the community as a whole for their attendance and support of our concerts and performances.”.  Tom Underwood, board chair for the chorus, agrees with that sentiment.  “”We are pleased to announce that this year’s main concerts will again be held at the Ursuline Arts Center.   In the past, we have enjoyed an excellent working relationship with Play Dance Bar, as the gracious host of our events.  However, due to our ever-growing audience and chorus, we found it necessary to move into a large venue,” Tom said.
The Louisville Gay Men’s Chorus is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization whose mission is to provide the opportunity for gay and gay-supportive men to sing together. The primary purpose of the chorus is musical excellence in performance, for the education, enjoyment and cultural enrichment of our audiences and ourselves. While striving to achieve this purpose, the chorus also seeks to provide social and fellowship experiences which reach beyond the realm of musical purpose to deepen and enrich our lives. Further, we will provide opportunities to present a positive image of the gay community to the general public by being identified as an organization of individuals who are making a contribution to the entire community.
For more information, please go to www.louisvillegaymenschorus.com.
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A Houndmouth Homecoming at Carnegie

Story by Grant Vance | Photos by Grant Vance and Courtesy Photos

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Courtesy Photo

Homecoming is held to especially pertinent standards when it comes to the New Albany-based musicians comprising the rock group Houndmouth. A little bit of southern rock, gospel and folk help describe their style, but Carnegie Center for Art and History knows their sound isn’t simplified by the confines of genre.

“They’re all so grounded in New Albany. When they’re on national TV [Houndmouth doesn’t] say they’re from the Louisville area,” Sally Newkirk, director of the Carnegie Center, said. “They’re like ambassadors for New Albany.”

It’s a naturalistic aspect ingrained in their history, lead guitarist Matt Myers explained. “It wasn’t even something we thought about. It was just, like, this is where we’re from,” he said. “I guess it’s the Midwest in us. We can’t lie even a little bit.”houndmouth

The Carnegie Center’s Houndmouth exhibit celebrating the band’s “trajectory of success” opened Oct. 28 and runs through Jan. 21. The exhibit is being held in honor of Indiana’s Bicentennial year.

“We were thinking: What can we do that’s different? What can do to attract a younger audience?” Newkirk said, recalling the decision-making process for the exhibit. “So I said, ‘What if we come up with a theme of who’s making history now?’ Houndmouth was perfect.”

Houndmouth is a relatively young band, formed in 2011 and with only two studio albums: From the Hills Below the City (2013) and Little Neon Limelight (2015). They are a four-piece gone three-piece, with Matt Myers on guitar and vocals, Zak Appleby on bass and vocals and Shane Cody on drums and vocals. Katie Toupin, who formerly played keyboard as well as vocals, departed from the band in April of 2016 to “pursue other opportunities,” according to the band’s official statement on their website.

Despite their high profile status, the members of Houndmouth exude high levels of humility.

“(The exhibit is) very flattering,” Myers said.” “We were, like, super hesitant to do it at first.” Newkirk recalled the band’s “deer in the headlights” response when she first approached them about it.

“I was talking to (Shane Cody’s mom) Peggy later of the idea of us doing an exhibit on them because they houndmouth4really didn’t feel like what they had done warranted an exhibit,” Newkirk said. “I talked to them later and their first reaction (was), ‘Who would even come see it?’ ”

A busy and vibrant opening night would say otherwise. And to no surprise, considering their growing national recognition.

“Some of my favorite objects are just real unassuming, (like the) cue cards from (being on national TV with) Conan (O’Brien) and (David) Letterman,” Newkirk said. “They’re just pieces of paper that someone has written on. … They’re such unassuming artifacts, but the story they tell is awesome.”

The cue cards are a dynamic addition to the exhibit, but far from the epitome of all it has to offer. Carnegie Center has gone to great links to give an authentic Houndmouth experience, collaborating with everyone from music rights groups such as BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) to the band’s families to compile the different attractions, which range from pieces of the band’s clothing to pictures of the members growing up, all of which establish a true intimacy.houndmouth2

“We had to get permission from BMI to make sure we could play Houndmouth music for the three-month run of the show under the license that we currently have from them,” Newkirk said. “But really, we truly couldn’t have done it without the parents and spouses.”

“We left to go on tour and while we were gone, our girlfriends and family went through all our stuff and gave them all our stuff,” Myers said.

The attractions, of course, make the exhibit the intricate experience it is. This is not simply a hall of fame of Houndmouth to date. Rather, it encompasses the group’s artistic sensibilities through artifacts of their history while also offering interactive features, including music hubs granting access to their work, and a Guitar Hero-style game, incorporating a functioning guitar with a specially-developed program allowing users to play through three Houndmouth songs.

The interactive features add some flair, but it’s the intimate attractions grounded in simplicity that really draw home what Houndmouth means to the area. Not to mention their direct ties to the Carnegie Center.

“(Shane Cody’s) grandparents (and two great aunts) were the founders of the museum,” Newkirk explained. “John and B.B. Cody were the New Albany historians. If you had any questions about New Albany history, they were the go-to people.”

Within the exhibit is a room dedicated to some of the art dedicated by the Codys, including George W. Morrison’s New Albany from Silver Hills, which was used as the cover art for Houndmouth’s first LP, From the Hills Below the City.

“I never know how to answer (the question of New Albany’s influence on writing),” Myers said, “but definitely where you grew up affects the music you write. And where you write affects the music you get.”

extol_digitalcover_600x400_houndmouth-1

A Houndmouth Homecoming at Carnegie

Story by Grant Vance | Photos by Grant Vance and Courtesy Photos

<img class=”size-medium wp-image-6704″ src=”http://b93.289.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Houndmouth3-300×137.png” alt=”Courtesy Photo ” width=”300″ height=”137″ /> Courtesy Photo

Homecoming is held to especially pertinent standards when it comes to the New Albany-based musicians comprising the rock group Houndmouth. A little bit of southern rock, gospel and folk help describe their style, but Carnegie Center for Art and History knows their sound isn’t simplified by the confines of genre.

“They’re all so grounded in New Albany. When they’re on national TV [Houndmouth doesn’t] say they’re from the Louisville area,” Sally Newkirk, director of the Carnegie Center, said. “They’re like ambassadors for New Albany.”

It’s a naturalistic aspect ingrained in their history, lead guitarist Matt Myers explained. “It wasn’t even something we thought about. It was just, like, this is where we’re from,” he said. “I guess it’s the Midwest in us. We can’t lie even a little bit.”<img class=”size-medium wp-image-6706 alignright” src=”http://b93.289.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Houndmouth-300×171.png” alt=”houndmouth” width=”300″ height=”171″ />

The Carnegie Center’s Houndmouth exhibit celebrating the band’s “trajectory of success” opened Oct. 28 and runs through Jan. 21. The exhibit is being held in honor of Indiana’s Bicentennial year.

“We were thinking: What can we do that’s different? What can do to attract a younger audience?” Newkirk said, recalling the decision-making process for the exhibit. “So I said, ‘What if we come up with a theme of who’s making history now?’ Houndmouth was perfect.”

Houndmouth is a relatively young band, formed in 2011 and with only two studio albums: From the Hills Below the City (2013) and Little Neon Limelight (2015). They are a four-piece gone three-piece, with Matt Myers on guitar and vocals, Zak Appleby on bass and vocals and Shane Cody on drums and vocals. Katie Toupin, who formerly played keyboard as well as vocals, departed from the band in April of 2016 to “pursue other opportunities,” according to the band’s official statement on their website.

Despite their high profile status, the members of Houndmouth exude high levels of humility.

“(The exhibit is) very flattering,” Myers said.” “We were, like, super hesitant to do it at first.” Newkirk recalled the band’s “deer in the headlights” response when she first approached them about it.

“I was talking to (Shane Cody’s mom) Peggy later of the idea of us doing an exhibit on them because they <img class=”size-medium wp-image-6707 alignleft” src=”http://b93.289.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Houndmouth4-300×191.png” alt=”houndmouth4″ width=”300″ height=”191″ />really didn’t feel like what they had done warranted an exhibit,” Newkirk said. “I talked to them later and their first reaction (was), ‘Who would even come see it?’ ”

A busy and vibrant opening night would say otherwise. And to no surprise, considering their growing national recognition.

“Some of my favorite objects are just real unassuming, (like the) cue cards from (being on national TV with) Conan (O’Brien) and (David) Letterman,” Newkirk said. “They’re just pieces of paper that someone has written on. … They’re such unassuming artifacts, but the story they tell is awesome.”

The cue cards are a dynamic addition to the exhibit, but far from the epitome of all it has to offer. Carnegie Center has gone to great links to give an authentic Houndmouth experience, collaborating with everyone from music rights groups such as BMI (Broadcast Music, Inc.) to the band’s families to compile the different attractions, which range from pieces of the band’s clothing to pictures of the members growing up, all of which establish a true intimacy.<img class=” wp-image-6705 alignright” src=”http://b93.289.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Houndmouth2-300×241.png” alt=”houndmouth2″ width=”228″ height=”183″ />

“We had to get permission from BMI to make sure we could play Houndmouth music for the three-month run of the show under the license that we currently have from them,” Newkirk said. “But really, we truly couldn’t have done it without the parents and spouses.”

“We left to go on tour and while we were gone, our girlfriends and family went through all our stuff and gave them all our stuff,” Myers said.

The attractions, of course, make the exhibit the intricate experience it is. This is not simply a hall of fame of Houndmouth to date. Rather, it encompasses the group’s artistic sensibilities through artifacts of their history while also offering interactive features, including music hubs granting access to their work, and a Guitar Hero-style game, incorporating a functioning guitar with a specially-developed program allowing users to play through three Houndmouth songs.

The interactive features add some flair, but it’s the intimate attractions grounded in simplicity that really draw home what Houndmouth means to the area. Not to mention their direct ties to the Carnegie Center.

“(Shane Cody’s) grandparents (and two great aunts) were the founders of the museum,” Newkirk explained. “John and B.B. Cody were the New Albany historians. If you had any questions about New Albany history, they were the go-to people.”

Within the exhibit is a room dedicated to some of the art dedicated by the Codys, including George W. Morrison’s New Albany from Silver Hills, which was used as the cover art for Houndmouth’s first LP, From the Hills Below the City.

“I never know how to answer (the question of New Albany’s influence on writing),” Myers said, “but definitely where you grew up affects the music you write. And where you write affects the music you get.”

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Reel Biz | Sapphire on Spring Boutique

Sapphire on Spring Boutique is a trendy, unique spot to shop for all the latest fashion in downtown Jeffersonville. Their goal is not only to provide a source for top of the line fashion, but also to incorporate the community by providing an outlet for artists and other businesses in the area.

They’re located on 326 Spring St. in Jeffersonville and can be reached at 812.920.0017

Check out Extol TV’s Reel Biz coverage below.

PRESS RELEASE | Mid-America Print Council Reception

Main Gallery

 Journey by: Donna Stallard

Second Floor Gallery

Imaginary Prisons:

Retelling Piranesi’s “Carceri d’Invenzione”

Portfolio Exchange compiled by David Spencer-Pierce

Artist Reception: Sept.  9, 2016, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Mid-America Print Council Conference Reception: Oct.  6, 2016, 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Journey represents a physical and mental passage for me. Each of these boxes or containers had a previous purpose/intention before somehow they were presented in this exhibition. In most cases, each of the BX is created for a specific person, some knowingly while others are oblivious.” D. Stallard

Donna Stallard’s series of printed works finds inspiration in working with recycled, reclaimed boxes. Her generations of artist/printmakers were traditionally trained using very toxic, sometimes harmful chemicals. Because of this, she feels a need to create works that can be seen as environmentally friendly. She inherited her dad’s hoarding tendencies, and will keep and even move these items from place to place and state to state until she resolves their usefulness. She began to look at the number of discarded, sometimes unrecyclable containers that exist all around us; these would be the impetus for creating the series of works titled BX (boxes). Several of the BX pieces are interactive and meant to be manipulated by the viewer giving them an opportunity to roll the dice or remove a HDR to rearrange its position or location.

While working on the BX series, I simultaneously began working on the HDR (hand roller) series incorporating prints constructed to mimic the actual roller used to create my works. Since learning to use this tool, I have predominately dedicated my creative research to printing. I truly like all aspects of the print process, from the physicality of using the hand rollers and presses, to mixing the inks and using acids to etch matrixes.

“Imaginary Prisons” is a collaboration of contemporary print artists in the retelling of Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s “Carceri d’Invenzione.” Despite his contributions to the classical revival of his era, and his more traditional architectural vistas this seminal graphic series is certainly his most influential among artists and printmakers in particular.

The “Carceri” are dark, oppressive, seemingly never-ending prison-scapes of the mind. This highly imaginative series draws heavily from Piranesi’s architectural training, while still maintaining a mystery, and atmosphere of foreboding that continues to inspire many more than 200 years after their creation.

11 contemporary printmakers have come together to reexamine this classic series, each creating a vision of their own personal prisons, imaginary or otherwise. In doing so, they have had a unique chance to combine tradition, history, and practice.

 

For more Information please contact Julie Schweitzer at Julie@artscouncilsi.org www.artscouncilsi.org or 812-949-4238 or for conference information go to https://midamericaprintcouncil.org/ .

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KMAC REDUX

Photography by Gary Barragan

This past spring, Gary Barragan was commissioned as the principal photographer for the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft and their annual “Art Walks the Runway” couture show. At the show, which was rich in designs and talent, Barragan met Jeffersonville designer Frances Lewis. Both expressed interest in collaborating one day. “As I was reviewing and posting images from the runway show, there was one design, one frozen moment,” Barragan recalled. “It was this piece (by Lewis shown on model Centria Kapris) and I knew right there what we would be collaborating on. I wanted to revisit this moment but from an artistic angle in the studio and out on location. I envisioned taking what was captured at the event and giving it life none of us had imagined.” This was certainly achieved in “KMAC Redux,” which Extol is proud to feature on our pages.

“My favorite thing about projects like these is the freedom,” Lewis said. “No one to please but myself, no need to concern myself with practicality, no budget, no limits. Just get my hands dirty and create. This particular piece is a part of a larger series that tells the stories and pays homage to one of the many battles of my black womanhood: my hair. All pieces were made out of synthetic hair extensions or hair accessories and styling tools. To be completely honest, this was an exercise in bravery for me. I used to shy away from things involving race and culture because I was afraid of what other people would think of me. Would they accept me? Would I make people uncomfortable? But at some point I realized, I’m the only one qualified to tell my story. And if I don’t tell it, then who else will? The day I decided for myself what it meant to be Frances, a proud black artist and woman, was probably the most freeing day of my life. And thus this piece (shown on Kapris) was born. This piece is indeed my favorite and means more to me than anyone will ever know. I’m beyond pleased with what we all created that day.”

Photography | Gary Barragan www.garybarragan.com @photobygaryb
Wardrobe Designer & Styling | Frances Lewis www.ann-deevelyn.com
Make Up | Keisha Mink kisseskmink@gmail.com 502.455.9094
Model | Centria Kapris @cen_tria
Management | natashacurtis@att.net
Assistants | Renee Williamson and Amina Ri Bella

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PRESS RELEASE | New gallery opens with exhibit of Cuban art

A Butchertown gallery opens with its first exhibit this month when Moremen-Moloney Contemporary presents “Cuban Art: Influence and Articulation” curated by Carlos Gamez de Francisco and Latin American art historian Yarima Hernandez.

Founded by interior designer Susan Moloney Byrd, owner of Moloney Smith Design, and art collector Susan Moremen, the gallery plans to exhibit contemporary art by established and emerging national and international artists.

Artist Gamez de Francisco’s work began to capture attention less than two years after he arrived in Louisville from his home country of Cuba with his sights set on painting. Since then, his work has been seen at several galleries around the city, including 21C Museum Hotel and the Muhammad Ali Center, where he was artist in residence for a year.

While this exhibit doesn’t include work by Gamez de Francisco, it does include works by three Cuban artists Maikel Dominguez, Lisyanet Rodgriguez and Yovani Caisé.

Dominguez’s paintings – carrying the subtitle “Beautiful Absences” – are intimate portraits that bear his subjects’ imperfections that bring out their humanity.

Rodgriguez describes her portraits – of charcoal on canvas – as “subtle realism.” They portray highly detailed images of people, animals and landscapes that present keen depth

Caisé, who titles his collection of works “Provocations,” creates expressionistic and figurative paintings that whirl with color to combine the beauty of the natural world, including humans and animals, with visual snatches of technology.

WHEN: Friday, Sept. 9, through Oct 1. Opening reception is 5:30-8 p.m., Friday, Sept. 9.

WHERE: Moremen-Moloney Contemporary, 939 E. Washington St. Gallery hours are 1-4 p.m., Saturdays, and onSunday, Sept. 11, or by appointment.

COST: Free admission

INFORMATION: (502) 727-3909; www.moremenmoloneygallery.com, www.maikeldominguez.com, www.lisyanet-rodriguez.co.uk, www.facebook.com/yovani.caise, www.carlosgamezdefrancisco.com

Reach reporter Elizabeth Kramer at (502) 582-4682 and ekramer@courier-journal.com. Follow her on Twitter @arts_bureau and on Facebook at Elizabeth Kramer – Arts Writer.